Abstract Title

DIFFERENCES IN HEALTH BEHAVIORS BETWEEN MEDICAL SCHOOL FACULTY AND STAFF

Presenter Name

Stephen D. Ake

Abstract

The 2012 National Gallup-Healthways survey found that physicians and nurses are healthier than other workers. However, objective data to adequately describe the health status in clinicians versus non-clinicians is lacking. We measured and compared physiological health indices and behaviors between medical school faculty and staff.

Presentation Type

Poster

Purpose (a):

The 2012 National Gallup-Healthways survey using self-report phone interviews found that physicians and nurses are healthier than other workers. However, objective data to adequately describe the health status in clinicians versus non-clinicians is lacking. Here, we objectively measured and compared physiological health indices and behaviors between medical school faculty and staff.

Methods (b):

A prospective, cross-sectional pilot study was conducted to compare routine health and well-being between faculty and non-faculty medical school employees (n=69). Information about routine preventative health behaviors, inoculations, exercise, daily stress levels, and general life enjoyment were obtained. Subjects received $1 for completing all assessments. Data were analyzed using SPSS (version 19) and included analysis of variance to compare quantifiable variables and chi-square for categorical variables. All analyses were conducted using a 95% confidence level and an alpha level of 0.05 was used to determine statistical significance.

Results (c):

There were no statistically significant group differences between faculty and non-faculty staff in weekly exercise, daily stress levels, and general life enjoyment. 53% of staff exercised > 3 times/week than 25% of the faculty (p = 0.009). Based on the total population, 24% of combined faculty and staff did not receive a flu shot during the past 12-months (p = 0.026). More concerning was 25% of faculty and 78.6% of staff had not been TB tested in the past year. Significant differences emerged in faculty reporting higher levels of daily stress (p = 0.048), and lower overall levels of general life enjoyment than in non-faculty staff (p = 0.023).

Conclusions (d):

These data suggest that medical school faculty do not have better health outcomes or behaviors than non-faculty staff. Conversely, staff are significantly happier in life, exercise more often, and report less daily stress than faculty members. The data suggest that while faculty may take good care of others, they seem to put themselves at a higher risk for poor health outcomes. Further investigation is warranted.

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DIFFERENCES IN HEALTH BEHAVIORS BETWEEN MEDICAL SCHOOL FACULTY AND STAFF

The 2012 National Gallup-Healthways survey found that physicians and nurses are healthier than other workers. However, objective data to adequately describe the health status in clinicians versus non-clinicians is lacking. We measured and compared physiological health indices and behaviors between medical school faculty and staff.