Abstract Title

AN EVALUATION OF DIABETES KNOWLEDGE AMONGST TYPE 2 DIABETICS, HIGH RISK, AND LOW RISK DIABETIC POPULATIONS IN A RURAL COMMUNITY

Presenter Name

Ariel Riezenman

Presentation Type

Poster

Purpose (a):

It has been predicted that 1 of 3 adults in the US will have diabetes by 2050. Most Texas rural communities lack adequate healthcare professionals and resources to serve their residents. The assessment of diabetes knowledge in a rural community identifies groups that may benefit from diabetes education in efforts to prevent diabetes and its associated medical complications.

Methods (b):

A cross-sectional study was performed within Guadalupe County at hospital and clinical settings. A consent and 24-item survey was provided to each participant. Data abstracted from 122 individual surveys were analyzed on SAS. Participants were classified as either having type 2 diabetes or being of high/low risk for type 2 diabetes. Risk status was based on the number of diabetes risk factors outlined by the National Diabetes Informational Clearinghouse. Diabetes exposure was determined by either having diabetes or knowing someone with diabetes, such as a family member or friend. Diabetes knowledge was categorized based on number of correct questions: poor (poor (<8), average (9-16), good (17-24).

Results (c):

Participants had an average age of 43 years, were predominantly white (63.87%), and female (61.34%). The average number of correct responses from the diabetes knowledge questionnaire was 12.38 (±3.43), with majority of participants having average diabetes knowledge, 78.15%. Independent sample t-tests were conducted to compare the average number of correct responses from the diabetes knowledge questionnaire and both diabetes exposure and age. Specifically, those with diabetes exposure had a significantly higher average number of correct responses (M = 12.69, SD = 3.23) when compared to participants not exposed to diabetes (M = 9.27, SD = 3.88), t (117) = -3.28, p = 0.001. Similarly, the average number of correct responses was significantly different between participants aged 18 to 25 (M = 10.87, SD = 3.13) and those aged 26 and older (M = 13, SD = 3.28), t (113) = -3.10, p = 0.003. A one-way ANOVA noted a significant effect for risk status on average number of correct responses, F (2, 118) = 5.14, p=0.007. Post hoc analysis using the Tukey HSD test indicated that the average number of correct response for those with diabetes (M = 13.7, SD = 2.69) was significantly different from those at low risk (M = 11.29, SD = 3.85). However, those at high risk (M = 12.68, SD = 3.02) did not differ significantly from either those at low risk or those with type 2 diabetes. A one-way ANOVA showed no significant effect for gender on average number of correct responses, F (2, 118) = 1.78, p=0.173.

Conclusions (d):

Overall, this study supports targeted diabetes education for persons aged 18-25 years, regardless of gender, in rural communities due to their lower levels of diabetes knowledge compared to persons aged 26 and older. Through diabetes awareness programs and health education classes, diabetes prevention and future medical complications may be reduced in rural settings.

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AN EVALUATION OF DIABETES KNOWLEDGE AMONGST TYPE 2 DIABETICS, HIGH RISK, AND LOW RISK DIABETIC POPULATIONS IN A RURAL COMMUNITY