INDOOR SURFACE CONTAMINATION BY ISOCYANATES FROM CONSUMER PRODUCTS AS A POTENTIAL SOURCE OF SKIN EXPOSURE IN CHILDREN: A PILOT STUDY

Youcheng Liu, University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth
Jie Li, Shandong University
Kiyoung Lee, Seoul National University
David Sterling, University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth

Abstract

Isocyanates are confirmed cause of occupational asthma. Little has been studied on the relationship of environmental exposure to isocyanates and the risk of asthma. Isocyanate-containing consumer products are ubiquitously used in the homes in China. The exposure of infants and children in these homes to isocyanates and its contribution to the risk of asthma is not clear. To identify the sources of isocyanates in these homes, we conducted a pilot study in Jinan City, Shandong province, China to evaluate the type of surfaces containing isocyanates and the types of isocyanates present using wipe sampling technology. The results showed that aliphatic isocyanates were present on recently painted interior wall surfaces and aromatic isocyanates were present in furniture, bedding materials, wall papers and plywood floors. Isocyanates in the homes present an exposure risk to infants and young children, which may lead to the sensitization and asthma later in life. Quantitative assessments of isocyanate content on the surfaces and the evaluation on skin exposure through surface and skin wipe sampling, biological monitoring and immunologic testing are needed. The relationship between potential air and skin exposure and the risk of asthma in this area should be also investigated.

 

INDOOR SURFACE CONTAMINATION BY ISOCYANATES FROM CONSUMER PRODUCTS AS A POTENTIAL SOURCE OF SKIN EXPOSURE IN CHILDREN: A PILOT STUDY

Isocyanates are confirmed cause of occupational asthma. Little has been studied on the relationship of environmental exposure to isocyanates and the risk of asthma. Isocyanate-containing consumer products are ubiquitously used in the homes in China. The exposure of infants and children in these homes to isocyanates and its contribution to the risk of asthma is not clear. To identify the sources of isocyanates in these homes, we conducted a pilot study in Jinan City, Shandong province, China to evaluate the type of surfaces containing isocyanates and the types of isocyanates present using wipe sampling technology. The results showed that aliphatic isocyanates were present on recently painted interior wall surfaces and aromatic isocyanates were present in furniture, bedding materials, wall papers and plywood floors. Isocyanates in the homes present an exposure risk to infants and young children, which may lead to the sensitization and asthma later in life. Quantitative assessments of isocyanate content on the surfaces and the evaluation on skin exposure through surface and skin wipe sampling, biological monitoring and immunologic testing are needed. The relationship between potential air and skin exposure and the risk of asthma in this area should be also investigated.