Abstract Title

THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN ACCULTURATION AND RISK FOR TYPE 2 DIABETES IN MEXICAN-AMERICAN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

Presenter Name

José D. Retana

Abstract

The Association between Acculturation and Risk for Type 2 Diabetes in Mexican-American Children and Adolescents

Purpose/Intro: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) is increasing in children and adolescents of all races/ethnicities in the United States, but especially in minorities such as Hispanics. In particular, Mexican-American children and adolescents are experiencing onset of DM2 at alarming rates. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between acculturation to a Mexican or Anglo orientation and risk for DM2. Methods: Participants completed demographic questions and the brief Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans II (Brief ARSMA-II). A linear acculturation score was derived from the Mexican Oriented Scale (MOS) and the Anglo Oriented Scale (AOS). Adolescents 10-14 years and a parent/legal guardian were included. At risk for DM2 was determined by having ≥3 of the following: relative with diabetes, BMI 95th percentile, blood pressure 95th percentile, elevated glucose, or positive for Acanthosis Nigricans. Simple and multiple logistic regressions were performed with risk of DM2 (high/low) as the outcome and acculturation score as the primary predictor. The adjusted model controlled for child’s age, gender, highest household education, child and maternal birth country (US/not US). Results: Participants (N=144) were 49% female and 51% male. The mean age was 11.96 years (SD=1.45). Forty-five children/adolescents (31.3%) had 3 of 5 risk factors for DM2. Approximately half (53.3%) of high risk children/adolescents were “strongly Anglo-oriented” and “Assimilated”. Higher acculturation was associated with an increased odds of being high risk for DM2 [OR=1.50; 95% CI (1.00-2.25)] Conclusions: For each degree of increased Anglo acculturation, risk for DM2 increased by 50%. Therefore, children of Mexican descent are more at risk for DM2 as they/their families become more acculturated to the Anglo cultural orientation. The degree of acculturation of a child/family should be taken into consideration when developing diabetes preventions and interventions.

Purpose (a):

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) is increasing in children and adolescents of all races/ethnicities in the United States, but especially in minorities such as Hispanics. In particular, Mexican-American children and adolescents are experiencing onset of DM2 at alarming rates. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between acculturation to a Mexican or Anglo orientation and risk for DM2.

Methods (b):

Participants completed demographic questions and the brief Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans II (Brief ARSMA-II). A linear acculturation score was derived from the Mexican Oriented Scale (MOS) and the Anglo Oriented Scale (AOS).

Adolescents 10-14 years and a parent/legal guardian were included. At risk for DM2 was determined by having ≥3 of the following: relative with diabetes, BMI 95th percentile, blood pressure 95th percentile, elevated glucose, or positive for Acanthosis Nigricans.

Simple and multiple logistic regressions were performed with risk of DM2 (high/low) as the outcome and acculturation score as the primary predictor. The adjusted model controlled for child’s age, gender, highest household education, child and maternal birth country (US/not US).

Results (c):

Participants (N=144) were 49% female and 51% male. The mean age was 11.96 years (SD=1.45). Forty-five children/adolescents (31.3%) had 3 of 5 risk factors for DM2. Approximately half (53.3%) of high risk children/adolescents were “strongly Anglo-oriented” and “Assimilated”. Higher acculturation was associated with an increased odds of being high risk for DM2 [OR=1.50; 95% CI (1.00-2.25)]

Conclusions (d):

For each degree of increased Anglo acculturation, risk for DM2 increased by 50%. Therefore, children of Mexican descent are more at risk for DM2 as they/their families become more acculturated to the Anglo cultural orientation. The degree of acculturation of a child/family should be taken into consideration when developing diabetes preventions and interventions.

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THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN ACCULTURATION AND RISK FOR TYPE 2 DIABETES IN MEXICAN-AMERICAN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

The Association between Acculturation and Risk for Type 2 Diabetes in Mexican-American Children and Adolescents

Purpose/Intro: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) is increasing in children and adolescents of all races/ethnicities in the United States, but especially in minorities such as Hispanics. In particular, Mexican-American children and adolescents are experiencing onset of DM2 at alarming rates. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between acculturation to a Mexican or Anglo orientation and risk for DM2. Methods: Participants completed demographic questions and the brief Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans II (Brief ARSMA-II). A linear acculturation score was derived from the Mexican Oriented Scale (MOS) and the Anglo Oriented Scale (AOS). Adolescents 10-14 years and a parent/legal guardian were included. At risk for DM2 was determined by having ≥3 of the following: relative with diabetes, BMI 95th percentile, blood pressure 95th percentile, elevated glucose, or positive for Acanthosis Nigricans. Simple and multiple logistic regressions were performed with risk of DM2 (high/low) as the outcome and acculturation score as the primary predictor. The adjusted model controlled for child’s age, gender, highest household education, child and maternal birth country (US/not US). Results: Participants (N=144) were 49% female and 51% male. The mean age was 11.96 years (SD=1.45). Forty-five children/adolescents (31.3%) had 3 of 5 risk factors for DM2. Approximately half (53.3%) of high risk children/adolescents were “strongly Anglo-oriented” and “Assimilated”. Higher acculturation was associated with an increased odds of being high risk for DM2 [OR=1.50; 95% CI (1.00-2.25)] Conclusions: For each degree of increased Anglo acculturation, risk for DM2 increased by 50%. Therefore, children of Mexican descent are more at risk for DM2 as they/their families become more acculturated to the Anglo cultural orientation. The degree of acculturation of a child/family should be taken into consideration when developing diabetes preventions and interventions.