Abstract Title

COMPARISON OF BODY MASS INDEX PERCENTILE AND PERCENT BODY FAT ON RISK FACTORS FOR TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS IN CHILDREN AGED 10-14

Presenter Name

Shane I Fernando PhD MS

Abstract

The growing rate of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in children presents a critical public health problem for the future. However, assessment of T2DM risk among children can be challenging. Therefore, to improve assessment of risk, we examined the association between BMIP (body mass index percentile, a traditional indicator) with risk, compared to the association of percent body fat (PBF) with risk. Methods: Data were obtained from 290 10-14 year old adolescents who were patients in the pediatrics department of the University of North Texas Health Science Center, patients at Seminary Clinic in Fort Worth and recruited from community events. During study visits, subjects’ BMI percentile and percent body fat were obtained using standard height/weight measurements as well as through the use of a Tanita body composition device. Associations were then assessed using statistical regression models. Results: Among 290 subjects, 78.2% were of Hispanic origin, with approximately 13.4% being Black. Approximately 51% of subjects were female, while age distribution was evenly spread across 10-14. Logistic regression models found that both PBF and BMIP were significantly associated with Acanthosis nigricans (PBF: Sβ 0.584 vs. BMIP: Sβ 0.489), average systolic BP above 95th percentile (PBF: Sβ 0.219 vs. BMIP: Sβ 0.124), family history of T2DM (PBF: Sβ 0.189 vs. BMIP: Sβ 0.172), and high blood sugar test (PBF: Sβ 0.152 vs. BMIP: Sβ 0.119). Conclusions: The data from this study provides evidence that PBF may be a better measurement of T2DM risk among children compared to BMIP. It may be beneficial for pediatric and family physicians to measure PBF alongside BMIP to better ascertain a particular pediatric patient’s risk of T2DM.

Purpose (a):

The growing rate of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in children presents a critical public health problem for the future. However, assessment of T2DM risk among children can be challenging. Therefore, to improve assessment of risk, we examined the association between BMIP (body mass index percentile, a traditional indicator) with risk, compared to the association of percent body fat (PBF) with risk.

Methods (b):

Data were obtained from 290 10-14 year olds in North Central Texas participating in a study examining risk for T2DM. During study visits, subjects’ BMI percentile and percent body fat were obtained using a Tanita body composition device. Associations were then assessed using logistic regression models against four of the five critical risk factors for T2DM: Average blood pressure (BP) above 95th percentile or History of high BP, family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, positive sign of Acanthosis nigricans and a high blood sugar test.

Results (c):

Among 290 subjects, 78.2% were of Hispanic origin, with approximately 13.4% being Black. Approximately 51% of subjects were female, while age distribution was evenly spread across 10-14. Logistic regression models found that both PBF and BMIP were significantly associated with Acanthosis nigricans (PBF: Sβ 0.584 vs. BMIP: Sβ 0.489), average systolic BP above 95th percentile (PBF: Sβ 0.219 vs. BMIP: Sβ 0.124), family history of T2DM (PBF: Sβ 0.189 vs. BMIP: Sβ 0.172), and high blood sugar test (PBF: Sβ 0.152 vs. BMIP: Sβ 0.119).

Conclusions (d):

The data from this study provides evidence that PBF may be a better measurement of T2DM risk among children compared to BMIP. It may be beneficial for pediatric and family physicians to measure PBF alongside BMIP to better ascertain a particular pediatric patient’s risk of T2DM.

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COMPARISON OF BODY MASS INDEX PERCENTILE AND PERCENT BODY FAT ON RISK FACTORS FOR TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS IN CHILDREN AGED 10-14

The growing rate of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in children presents a critical public health problem for the future. However, assessment of T2DM risk among children can be challenging. Therefore, to improve assessment of risk, we examined the association between BMIP (body mass index percentile, a traditional indicator) with risk, compared to the association of percent body fat (PBF) with risk. Methods: Data were obtained from 290 10-14 year old adolescents who were patients in the pediatrics department of the University of North Texas Health Science Center, patients at Seminary Clinic in Fort Worth and recruited from community events. During study visits, subjects’ BMI percentile and percent body fat were obtained using standard height/weight measurements as well as through the use of a Tanita body composition device. Associations were then assessed using statistical regression models. Results: Among 290 subjects, 78.2% were of Hispanic origin, with approximately 13.4% being Black. Approximately 51% of subjects were female, while age distribution was evenly spread across 10-14. Logistic regression models found that both PBF and BMIP were significantly associated with Acanthosis nigricans (PBF: Sβ 0.584 vs. BMIP: Sβ 0.489), average systolic BP above 95th percentile (PBF: Sβ 0.219 vs. BMIP: Sβ 0.124), family history of T2DM (PBF: Sβ 0.189 vs. BMIP: Sβ 0.172), and high blood sugar test (PBF: Sβ 0.152 vs. BMIP: Sβ 0.119). Conclusions: The data from this study provides evidence that PBF may be a better measurement of T2DM risk among children compared to BMIP. It may be beneficial for pediatric and family physicians to measure PBF alongside BMIP to better ascertain a particular pediatric patient’s risk of T2DM.