Abstract Title

THE ROLE OF OXIDATIVE STRESS, INFLAMMATION, AND METABOLIC FACTORS IN ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE RISK AMONG NON-HISPANIC WHITE AND MEXICAN AMERICAN MALES

Presenter Name

Spencer Septien

Abstract

Research suggests that the biological marker profile associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) differs between non-Hispanic whites and Mexican Americans. High levels of oxidative stress are thought to precede the development of classical AD pathology including that of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. Assuming a relationship between levels of oxidative stress and the pathogenesis of AD, we chose to analyze the serum biological markers of male Mexican American and non-Hispanic white AD patients under conditions of high or low oxidative stress. We stratified the sample based on the level of oxidative stress, using a cut point of 12 μM serum homocysteine. Special consideration was given to markers associated with inflammation and metabolic disease, which have been shown to impact AD pathophysiology. Baseline levels of testosterone and glutathione s transferase (GST) were also measured for each demographic. Inflammatory involvement was apparent in both Mexican American men and non-Hispanic white males, with a much more profound affect among non-Hispanic whites. Metabolic factor involvement did not appear to be as significant among non-Hispanic white males in contrast to a clear involvement in Mexican American men. Levels of oxidative stress did not appear to alter the inflammatory or metabolic profile relationship in either demographic. Baseline levels of testosterone and GST were higher in Mexican Americans. Analysis suggests that ethnicity and oxidative stress impact AD pathophysiology and associated serum markers.

Purpose (a):

Research suggests that the biological marker profile associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) differs between non-Hispanic whites and Mexican Americans. High levels of oxidative stress are thought to precede the development of classical AD pathology including that of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques.

Methods (b):

Assuming a relationship between levels of oxidative stress and the pathogenesis of AD, we chose to analyze the serum biological markers of male Mexican American and non-Hispanic white AD patients under conditions of high or low oxidative stress. We stratified the sample based on the level of oxidative stress, using a cut point of 12 μM serum homocysteine. Special consideration was given to markers associated with inflammation and metabolic disease, which have been shown to impact AD pathophysiology. Baseline levels of testosterone and glutathione s transferase (GST) were also measured for each demographic.

Results (c):

Inflammatory involvement was apparent in both Mexican American men and non-Hispanic white males, with a much more profound affect among non-Hispanic whites. Metabolic factor involvement did not appear to be as significant among non-Hispanic white males in contrast to a clear involvement in Mexican American men. Levels of oxidative stress did not appear to alter the inflammatory or metabolic profile relationship in either demographic. Baseline levels of testosterone and GST were higher in Mexican Americans.

Conclusions (d):

Analysis suggests that ethnicity and oxidative stress impact AD pathophysiology and associated serum markers.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

THE ROLE OF OXIDATIVE STRESS, INFLAMMATION, AND METABOLIC FACTORS IN ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE RISK AMONG NON-HISPANIC WHITE AND MEXICAN AMERICAN MALES

Research suggests that the biological marker profile associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) differs between non-Hispanic whites and Mexican Americans. High levels of oxidative stress are thought to precede the development of classical AD pathology including that of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. Assuming a relationship between levels of oxidative stress and the pathogenesis of AD, we chose to analyze the serum biological markers of male Mexican American and non-Hispanic white AD patients under conditions of high or low oxidative stress. We stratified the sample based on the level of oxidative stress, using a cut point of 12 μM serum homocysteine. Special consideration was given to markers associated with inflammation and metabolic disease, which have been shown to impact AD pathophysiology. Baseline levels of testosterone and glutathione s transferase (GST) were also measured for each demographic. Inflammatory involvement was apparent in both Mexican American men and non-Hispanic white males, with a much more profound affect among non-Hispanic whites. Metabolic factor involvement did not appear to be as significant among non-Hispanic white males in contrast to a clear involvement in Mexican American men. Levels of oxidative stress did not appear to alter the inflammatory or metabolic profile relationship in either demographic. Baseline levels of testosterone and GST were higher in Mexican Americans. Analysis suggests that ethnicity and oxidative stress impact AD pathophysiology and associated serum markers.