Abstract Title

Parental Ideology of Diet and Exercise and Associated Risk of T2DM in Children

Presenter Name

Thomas Bauman

Abstract

Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in children is a major public health issue. This study examined parental ideology of diet and exercise and the associated risk of T2DM in children.

Methods: Data were obtained from 10-14 year old children in North Central Texas participating in a study examining risk for T2DM. Questions on parental ideology were measured using three questions, including “Making my child eat a healthy diet and exercise regularly would be pleasant,” “I intend to make my child eat a healthy diet and exercise regularly” and “Making my child eat healthy and exercise regularly will reduce their risk of developing diabetes”. Associations were assessed using logistic regression models controlled for race, gender, SES, neighborhood safety and age.

Results: Among 290 subjects, 5.7% were Caucasian, 15.4% were African-American, and 78.9% were Hispanic. Mean age was 11.87±1.4, while 50.3% of subjects were female. Increased pleasant perception of exercise and diet had decreased odds of being high risk for T2DM (0.916 OR, 95% CI: 0.901-1.124). Increased intention to make their child eat healthily and exercise had slightly increased odds of being high risk for T2DM (1.01 OR, 95% CI: 1.007-1.631). Finally, belief in healthy diet and exercise reducing risk for T2DM had decreased odds of being high risk for T2DM (0.969 OR, 95% CI: 0.591-0.997).

Conclusion: Results from this study suggest that parental ideology of diet and exercise is associated with a child’s risk for T2DM. Improving parents’ positive ideology of exercise and diet may reduce children’s risk of T2DM.

Presentation Type

Poster

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Parental Ideology of Diet and Exercise and Associated Risk of T2DM in Children

Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in children is a major public health issue. This study examined parental ideology of diet and exercise and the associated risk of T2DM in children.

Methods: Data were obtained from 10-14 year old children in North Central Texas participating in a study examining risk for T2DM. Questions on parental ideology were measured using three questions, including “Making my child eat a healthy diet and exercise regularly would be pleasant,” “I intend to make my child eat a healthy diet and exercise regularly” and “Making my child eat healthy and exercise regularly will reduce their risk of developing diabetes”. Associations were assessed using logistic regression models controlled for race, gender, SES, neighborhood safety and age.

Results: Among 290 subjects, 5.7% were Caucasian, 15.4% were African-American, and 78.9% were Hispanic. Mean age was 11.87±1.4, while 50.3% of subjects were female. Increased pleasant perception of exercise and diet had decreased odds of being high risk for T2DM (0.916 OR, 95% CI: 0.901-1.124). Increased intention to make their child eat healthily and exercise had slightly increased odds of being high risk for T2DM (1.01 OR, 95% CI: 1.007-1.631). Finally, belief in healthy diet and exercise reducing risk for T2DM had decreased odds of being high risk for T2DM (0.969 OR, 95% CI: 0.591-0.997).

Conclusion: Results from this study suggest that parental ideology of diet and exercise is associated with a child’s risk for T2DM. Improving parents’ positive ideology of exercise and diet may reduce children’s risk of T2DM.