Abstract Title

Psychomotor Videos for Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine (OMM) Instruction

Presenter Name

Anthony Handoyo

Abstract

Hypothesis: Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine (OMM) lab often consists of demonstration from the stage by a professor accompanied by small group practice with faculty table trainers. However, given a low faculty to student ratio, class demonstrations do not optimize student’s time with table trainers. We hypothesize that our instructional videos will improve student satisfaction by limiting need for class demonstration, thus increasing one on one instruction with table trainers.

Research Design: Prospective Experimental – IRB approved.

Materials and Methods: We designed videos with written instructions that incorporate psychomotor learning principles for year 2 osteopathic medical students. Instructional videos for Still and Facilitated Positional Release techniques were used in lieu of faculty demonstration during lab. Three surveys were administered to the second year Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine class to assess their satisfaction with the current teaching method compared to the new instructional videos. Clinical competency scores were also compared to the previous year’s class who did not have the videos.

Results: The instructional videos improved student confidence and satisfaction when compared to the traditional method. However, no clear statistical significance was found between exam scores when compared to the previous years’ students.

Conclusion: The new instructional videos showed improvements in student satisfaction and confidence compared to traditional methods. Use of the videos could allow more time for feedback from faculty table trainers. Exam scores did not improve, however factors involving small sample size and varying faculty graders could account for this finding. Videos could serve a valuable role in the education of osteopathic students in OMM.

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Psychomotor Videos for Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine (OMM) Instruction

Hypothesis: Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine (OMM) lab often consists of demonstration from the stage by a professor accompanied by small group practice with faculty table trainers. However, given a low faculty to student ratio, class demonstrations do not optimize student’s time with table trainers. We hypothesize that our instructional videos will improve student satisfaction by limiting need for class demonstration, thus increasing one on one instruction with table trainers.

Research Design: Prospective Experimental – IRB approved.

Materials and Methods: We designed videos with written instructions that incorporate psychomotor learning principles for year 2 osteopathic medical students. Instructional videos for Still and Facilitated Positional Release techniques were used in lieu of faculty demonstration during lab. Three surveys were administered to the second year Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine class to assess their satisfaction with the current teaching method compared to the new instructional videos. Clinical competency scores were also compared to the previous year’s class who did not have the videos.

Results: The instructional videos improved student confidence and satisfaction when compared to the traditional method. However, no clear statistical significance was found between exam scores when compared to the previous years’ students.

Conclusion: The new instructional videos showed improvements in student satisfaction and confidence compared to traditional methods. Use of the videos could allow more time for feedback from faculty table trainers. Exam scores did not improve, however factors involving small sample size and varying faculty graders could account for this finding. Videos could serve a valuable role in the education of osteopathic students in OMM.