Abstract Title

Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Promotes Immature Neutrophil Egress from the Bone Marrow

Presenter Name

Alexandra Witter

Abstract

Extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) regulates extracellular concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to protect tissues during infection and inflammation. Using three groups of mice with varying levels of ecSOD activity, we have previously shown that ecSOD activity enhances neutrophil recruitment to the liver, yet inhibits the innate immune response against Listeria monocytogenes (LM) leading to increased host susceptibility. However, it is unclear whether ecSOD activity affects neutrophil recruitment and function in a cell-intrinsic manner or by modulating the extracellular environment. Using adoptive transfer experiments, we observed that ecSOD activity does not affect neutrophil recruitment or function in a cell-intrinsic manner. Additionally, we determined that ecSOD activity protects the extracellular matrix (ECM) and leads to an increase in phenotypically immature neutrophils in the bone marrow and liver. Collectively, our data suggest that ecSOD activity inhibits degradation of the ECM and promotes egress of immature neutrophils out of the bone marrow and into the liver where they provide inadequate protection against LM. These studies highlight the potential therapeutic value of ecSOD inhibitors to enhance immune responses during bacterial infections.

Presentation Type

Oral

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Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Promotes Immature Neutrophil Egress from the Bone Marrow

Extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) regulates extracellular concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to protect tissues during infection and inflammation. Using three groups of mice with varying levels of ecSOD activity, we have previously shown that ecSOD activity enhances neutrophil recruitment to the liver, yet inhibits the innate immune response against Listeria monocytogenes (LM) leading to increased host susceptibility. However, it is unclear whether ecSOD activity affects neutrophil recruitment and function in a cell-intrinsic manner or by modulating the extracellular environment. Using adoptive transfer experiments, we observed that ecSOD activity does not affect neutrophil recruitment or function in a cell-intrinsic manner. Additionally, we determined that ecSOD activity protects the extracellular matrix (ECM) and leads to an increase in phenotypically immature neutrophils in the bone marrow and liver. Collectively, our data suggest that ecSOD activity inhibits degradation of the ECM and promotes egress of immature neutrophils out of the bone marrow and into the liver where they provide inadequate protection against LM. These studies highlight the potential therapeutic value of ecSOD inhibitors to enhance immune responses during bacterial infections.