Abstract Title

One OMT Session Lowers Cortisol and Brings Sustained Pain Relief: A Prospective Treatment Trial

Presenter Name

Andrew P King DO

Abstract

Hypothesis: In acute pain patients, one treatment of osteopathic manipulative therapy (OMT) will increase range-of-motion (ROM), decrease pain, reduce stress, and lower inflammation as measured by salivary cortisol. Methods: A prospective, open-label, longitudinal, proof-of-concept treatment intervention trial was designed to test the hypotheses. Institutional Review Board approval and patient consent to participate in the study were obtained prior to recruitment. Inclusion criteria: Subjects with acute pain lasting <3-months who abstained from smoking, exercising, eating, drinking, chewing gum for 1½ - 2-hours. Exclusion criteria: Patients with diseases/illnesses affecting cortisol functioning, medications affecting cortisol production, diseases or conditions that are a contraindication for OMT, recent hospitalization /surgeries, pregnancy. Salivary cortisol was collected pre-OMT (after a 20-minute rest) and 30-minutes post-OMT from 1-5pm on the day of the intervention. Dependent variables were range of motion (ROM), stress, and pain levels. Types of OMT performed included Muscle Energy, Myofascial Release, Rib Raising, HVLA, Functional Methods and Counterstrain. Results: One session of OMT significantly reduced stress, pain and increased overall neck ROM (p < 0.000) immediately after treatment and reduced pain levels reported 2-weeks later. Cortisol was a relevant biomarker in predicting inflammatory responses associated with pre- and post-OMT neck flexion (F = -8.24, p = 0.01), left side bending), (F = 3.61, p = 0.07) and right side bending (F = 4.32, p = 0.057). Conclusion: Brief OMT was effective for increasing neck ROM, reducing pain-related stress and alleviating physical pain measured at the immediate post-OMT and 2-week conditions. Changes in salivary cortisol levels may also be a viable biomarker of OMT efficacy.

Presentation Type

Poster

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One OMT Session Lowers Cortisol and Brings Sustained Pain Relief: A Prospective Treatment Trial

Hypothesis: In acute pain patients, one treatment of osteopathic manipulative therapy (OMT) will increase range-of-motion (ROM), decrease pain, reduce stress, and lower inflammation as measured by salivary cortisol. Methods: A prospective, open-label, longitudinal, proof-of-concept treatment intervention trial was designed to test the hypotheses. Institutional Review Board approval and patient consent to participate in the study were obtained prior to recruitment. Inclusion criteria: Subjects with acute pain lasting <3-months who abstained from smoking, exercising, eating, drinking, chewing gum for 1½ - 2-hours. Exclusion criteria: Patients with diseases/illnesses affecting cortisol functioning, medications affecting cortisol production, diseases or conditions that are a contraindication for OMT, recent hospitalization /surgeries, pregnancy. Salivary cortisol was collected pre-OMT (after a 20-minute rest) and 30-minutes post-OMT from 1-5pm on the day of the intervention. Dependent variables were range of motion (ROM), stress, and pain levels. Types of OMT performed included Muscle Energy, Myofascial Release, Rib Raising, HVLA, Functional Methods and Counterstrain. Results: One session of OMT significantly reduced stress, pain and increased overall neck ROM (p < 0.000) immediately after treatment and reduced pain levels reported 2-weeks later. Cortisol was a relevant biomarker in predicting inflammatory responses associated with pre- and post-OMT neck flexion (F = -8.24, p = 0.01), left side bending), (F = 3.61, p = 0.07) and right side bending (F = 4.32, p = 0.057). Conclusion: Brief OMT was effective for increasing neck ROM, reducing pain-related stress and alleviating physical pain measured at the immediate post-OMT and 2-week conditions. Changes in salivary cortisol levels may also be a viable biomarker of OMT efficacy.