Abstract Title

Analysis of Approach and Motion Velocities in Dominant Hands While Performing Daily Activities

Presenter Name

Jessica K Juarez

Abstract

Analysis of Approach and Motion Velocities in Dominant Hands While Performing Daily Activities

Previous studies have shown individual force sensors to be a simple means of providing feedback about the environment to a robot. Combining the data of velocity in two phases (approach and motion) from a touch sensitive surface glove can provide insight into the neural processes that govern muscle movements during approach, pushing, and pulling of an object. The analysis of these interactions may be used to streamline the motions of a robot to simulate the average adult human’s movement while performing simple tasks. Data from dominant hand positions and velocities from ten people was collected using a motion capture system (Motion Analysis Corp, Santa Rosa, CA). There were five females and five males with ages 23-51. Quantitative data of both motion and velocity was collected on five trials and averaged across the cohort for analysis. The ‎ average minimum velocity during approach for a push movement was 0.546 meters/second, 0.579 meters/second, and 0.632 meters/second for a cylinder weight of three, five, ten pounds respectively. Trends show that as weight increases, so does the minimum velocity of approach in the palm position. Future analysis of these data will include providing information for building simulated and eventually physical human-robot interaction systems to aid in daily activities.

Presentation Type

Poster

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Analysis of Approach and Motion Velocities in Dominant Hands While Performing Daily Activities

Analysis of Approach and Motion Velocities in Dominant Hands While Performing Daily Activities

Previous studies have shown individual force sensors to be a simple means of providing feedback about the environment to a robot. Combining the data of velocity in two phases (approach and motion) from a touch sensitive surface glove can provide insight into the neural processes that govern muscle movements during approach, pushing, and pulling of an object. The analysis of these interactions may be used to streamline the motions of a robot to simulate the average adult human’s movement while performing simple tasks. Data from dominant hand positions and velocities from ten people was collected using a motion capture system (Motion Analysis Corp, Santa Rosa, CA). There were five females and five males with ages 23-51. Quantitative data of both motion and velocity was collected on five trials and averaged across the cohort for analysis. The ‎ average minimum velocity during approach for a push movement was 0.546 meters/second, 0.579 meters/second, and 0.632 meters/second for a cylinder weight of three, five, ten pounds respectively. Trends show that as weight increases, so does the minimum velocity of approach in the palm position. Future analysis of these data will include providing information for building simulated and eventually physical human-robot interaction systems to aid in daily activities.