Abstract Title

Comparing Traditional Case-Based Application and Student Question Creation Exercise on Student Performance and Perceptions

RAD Assignment Number

801

Presenter Name

Carol Kominski

Abstract

Objective: To compare impact of traditional case-based application exercise to student question creation exercise on a) student exam performance, b) student perceptions of enjoyment, competence, understanding, effort, interest in continuing participation and interest in subject.

Methods: Subjects were 84 second-year pharmacy students in fall 2015 pharmacotherapy course. Research focus was active learning dealing with chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Students formed 12 teams with 6-7 students each. Teams were randomly assigned to either case-based or student question creation exercises using PeerWise. Four multiple choice questions related to CKD-MBD assessed student performance prior to and after participation. After completion an online survey assessed perceptions of enjoyment, competence, understanding, effort, interest in continuing participation, and interest in the subject matter. The UNTHSC Institutional Review Board approved the study protocol.

Data Analysis: Two sample t tests assuming equal variances were used to compare the group experiencing student question creation with the group experiencing the case-based exercise on a) enjoyment, competence, understanding, effort, interest in continuing participation, and interest in the subject matter and b) gain scores on four multiple choice test questions administered prior to and after introduction of the subject matter.

Results: Student survey responses demonstrate clearly that student question creation holds promise as an active learning tool with Pharmacy students. Two sample t tests assuming unequal variances found statistically significant differences in favor of the student question creation group on enjoyment and interest in the subject matter although other differences between the two groups on the survey questions were not significant. A two sample t test comparing the traditional case-based group to the student question creation group on gain score from pretest to posttest on the four questions related to CKD-MBD found statistically insignificant differences between the groups.

Conclusions: Based upon student perceptions, student question creation has demonstrated potential as a useful learning tool. Insignificant differences on some measures of student perception as well as pretest-posttest gain scores may be due to a relatively small sample size and a very small number of test questions. The researchers expect that larger samples and repeated applications will confirm and extend positive findings in support of student question creation.

Presentation Type

Poster

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Comparing Traditional Case-Based Application and Student Question Creation Exercise on Student Performance and Perceptions

Objective: To compare impact of traditional case-based application exercise to student question creation exercise on a) student exam performance, b) student perceptions of enjoyment, competence, understanding, effort, interest in continuing participation and interest in subject.

Methods: Subjects were 84 second-year pharmacy students in fall 2015 pharmacotherapy course. Research focus was active learning dealing with chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Students formed 12 teams with 6-7 students each. Teams were randomly assigned to either case-based or student question creation exercises using PeerWise. Four multiple choice questions related to CKD-MBD assessed student performance prior to and after participation. After completion an online survey assessed perceptions of enjoyment, competence, understanding, effort, interest in continuing participation, and interest in the subject matter. The UNTHSC Institutional Review Board approved the study protocol.

Data Analysis: Two sample t tests assuming equal variances were used to compare the group experiencing student question creation with the group experiencing the case-based exercise on a) enjoyment, competence, understanding, effort, interest in continuing participation, and interest in the subject matter and b) gain scores on four multiple choice test questions administered prior to and after introduction of the subject matter.

Results: Student survey responses demonstrate clearly that student question creation holds promise as an active learning tool with Pharmacy students. Two sample t tests assuming unequal variances found statistically significant differences in favor of the student question creation group on enjoyment and interest in the subject matter although other differences between the two groups on the survey questions were not significant. A two sample t test comparing the traditional case-based group to the student question creation group on gain score from pretest to posttest on the four questions related to CKD-MBD found statistically insignificant differences between the groups.

Conclusions: Based upon student perceptions, student question creation has demonstrated potential as a useful learning tool. Insignificant differences on some measures of student perception as well as pretest-posttest gain scores may be due to a relatively small sample size and a very small number of test questions. The researchers expect that larger samples and repeated applications will confirm and extend positive findings in support of student question creation.