Abstract Title

Self-Efficacy in Relation to Access to a Health Provider

RAD Assignment Number

1122

Presenter Name

Ike R. Eke

Abstract

Background: Obesity is one of the most predominant health concerns within the African American community, particularly among women. It is heavily associated with diseases such as type II diabetes and high blood pressure in addition to other weight related health complications. It is perceived that patients who have access to a healthcare provider have better self-efficacy concerning health behaviors and therefore more likely to have improved health outcomes.

Methods: Cross-sectional data was used to review a survey administered at baseline to participants in the Better Me Within program. The relationship between provider access, dietary habits, and confidence (measured with the PANSE survey) were evaluated. Further, these relationships were evaluated in regards to indicators of chronic diseases such as body mass index (BMI), fasting glucose level, and cholesterol to determine whether there was a relationship between access to a provider and these health markers.

Results: A total of 145 African American women with a BMI at or over 25 participated in the surveys. Data showed a positive relationship between provider access and lower glucose levels. There was no significant difference in the mean confidence (PANSE) scores between those who identified as having access to a health provider and those that did not. Data also showed no significant difference in the BMI of participants with and without access to a healthcare provider.

Conclusions: In our sample, self-efficacy for health behaviors was not different for individuals with and without access to a healthcare provider. However, glucose levels were healthier when individuals had access to a health care provider. Future research should explore what psychosocial variables are related to provider access to determine strategies to motivate individuals to find a medical home, which is linked to more positive health outcomes.

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Self-Efficacy in Relation to Access to a Health Provider

Background: Obesity is one of the most predominant health concerns within the African American community, particularly among women. It is heavily associated with diseases such as type II diabetes and high blood pressure in addition to other weight related health complications. It is perceived that patients who have access to a healthcare provider have better self-efficacy concerning health behaviors and therefore more likely to have improved health outcomes.

Methods: Cross-sectional data was used to review a survey administered at baseline to participants in the Better Me Within program. The relationship between provider access, dietary habits, and confidence (measured with the PANSE survey) were evaluated. Further, these relationships were evaluated in regards to indicators of chronic diseases such as body mass index (BMI), fasting glucose level, and cholesterol to determine whether there was a relationship between access to a provider and these health markers.

Results: A total of 145 African American women with a BMI at or over 25 participated in the surveys. Data showed a positive relationship between provider access and lower glucose levels. There was no significant difference in the mean confidence (PANSE) scores between those who identified as having access to a health provider and those that did not. Data also showed no significant difference in the BMI of participants with and without access to a healthcare provider.

Conclusions: In our sample, self-efficacy for health behaviors was not different for individuals with and without access to a healthcare provider. However, glucose levels were healthier when individuals had access to a health care provider. Future research should explore what psychosocial variables are related to provider access to determine strategies to motivate individuals to find a medical home, which is linked to more positive health outcomes.