Abstract Title

Does Arthritis Risk Differ by Veteran Status in Males 35-54?

RAD Assignment Number

1601

Presenter Name

Vic Holmes, PA-C

Abstract

Introduction: Studies suggest that arthritis is common among veterans and activity duty service members. This study assessed whether serving in the armed forces increases the risk for arthritis in a representative sample of males ages 35 to 54.

Methods: This was a cross-sectional analysis using 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data for males ages 35 to 54 in California, Florida, North Carolina, Texas, and Virginia. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between veteran status and arthritis while controlling for age, educational level, employment status, income level, marital status, race/ethnicity, general health, activity level, activity limitations, weight status, chronic health problems, depression, alcohol use, and tobacco use.

Results: About 13-22% of males reported arthritis; 11-24% reported veteran status; and 24% of veterans reported arthritis. The results of adjusted analyses indicated that veteran status and arthritis are significantly related.

Conclusions: Overall, veteran status and arthritis were significantly related after controlling for demographic and psychosocial variables in a representative sample of males ages 35-54. Awareness of risk factors for arthritis including veteran status in males ages 35-54 can aid in the early diagnosis and treatment of this disease.

Presentation Type

Poster

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Does Arthritis Risk Differ by Veteran Status in Males 35-54?

Introduction: Studies suggest that arthritis is common among veterans and activity duty service members. This study assessed whether serving in the armed forces increases the risk for arthritis in a representative sample of males ages 35 to 54.

Methods: This was a cross-sectional analysis using 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data for males ages 35 to 54 in California, Florida, North Carolina, Texas, and Virginia. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between veteran status and arthritis while controlling for age, educational level, employment status, income level, marital status, race/ethnicity, general health, activity level, activity limitations, weight status, chronic health problems, depression, alcohol use, and tobacco use.

Results: About 13-22% of males reported arthritis; 11-24% reported veteran status; and 24% of veterans reported arthritis. The results of adjusted analyses indicated that veteran status and arthritis are significantly related.

Conclusions: Overall, veteran status and arthritis were significantly related after controlling for demographic and psychosocial variables in a representative sample of males ages 35-54. Awareness of risk factors for arthritis including veteran status in males ages 35-54 can aid in the early diagnosis and treatment of this disease.