Abstract Title

Osteopathic Manipulative Techniques Alter Gastric Myoelectrical Activity in Healthy Subjects

RAD Assignment Number

1706

Presenter Name

Edward C Shadiack III, DO

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Osteopathic Manipulative Techniques (OMT) have been shown to alter autonomic control of heart rate. However, it is unclear if OMT affects control of gastric myoelectrical activity (GMA).

HYPOTHESIS: We hypothesized that OMT significantly alters power spectral density (PSD) analyses of electrogastrography (EGG) recordings compared with sham OMT.

METHODS: IRB approval was obtained for this protocol. Subjects were studied before and after sham treatment and OMT (both vagal and sympathetic directed techniques) on separate days in a cross-over design. 15 minute EGG recordings were obtained before and after each intervention and after a water challenge (WC; a standard vagal stimulus of GMA). The WC involved drinking 500 mL of 16 οC water over 5 min. Percent power in the normogastric range (PPN; 2-4 counts/min) was estimated from PSD analyses of EGG recordings. Absolute percent change of PPN (∆PPN) from baseline to post-intervention and baseline to post-WC was computed and compared using paired t-tests and two-way repeated-measures ANOVA.

RESULTS: OMT significantly altered ∆PPN versus sham control (sham: 5.3%, OMT: 24.5%, P=0.015). WC significantly altered ∆PPN compared to sham control (post-sham ∆PPN: 5.3%, post-drink ∆PPN: 30.3%, P

CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that (a) OMT significantly alters GMA compared to sham control and (b) that OMT produces similar changes in GMA to WC.

Presentation Type

Poster

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Osteopathic Manipulative Techniques Alter Gastric Myoelectrical Activity in Healthy Subjects

INTRODUCTION: Osteopathic Manipulative Techniques (OMT) have been shown to alter autonomic control of heart rate. However, it is unclear if OMT affects control of gastric myoelectrical activity (GMA).

HYPOTHESIS: We hypothesized that OMT significantly alters power spectral density (PSD) analyses of electrogastrography (EGG) recordings compared with sham OMT.

METHODS: IRB approval was obtained for this protocol. Subjects were studied before and after sham treatment and OMT (both vagal and sympathetic directed techniques) on separate days in a cross-over design. 15 minute EGG recordings were obtained before and after each intervention and after a water challenge (WC; a standard vagal stimulus of GMA). The WC involved drinking 500 mL of 16 οC water over 5 min. Percent power in the normogastric range (PPN; 2-4 counts/min) was estimated from PSD analyses of EGG recordings. Absolute percent change of PPN (∆PPN) from baseline to post-intervention and baseline to post-WC was computed and compared using paired t-tests and two-way repeated-measures ANOVA.

RESULTS: OMT significantly altered ∆PPN versus sham control (sham: 5.3%, OMT: 24.5%, P=0.015). WC significantly altered ∆PPN compared to sham control (post-sham ∆PPN: 5.3%, post-drink ∆PPN: 30.3%, P

CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that (a) OMT significantly alters GMA compared to sham control and (b) that OMT produces similar changes in GMA to WC.