Abstract Title

Does Access to Preventative Care Differ by Metropolitan Status for Women Aged 35-45?

RAD Assignment Number

2104

Presenter Name

Jessica Hartos, PhD

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between metropolitan status and access to preventative care. Differences in access to preventive care by metropolitan status were assessed using 2013 BRFSS data for representative samples of women ages 35-45 in 6 states while controlling for demographic characteristics. The results indicated that metropolitan status was not significantly related to access to preventative care but healthcare coverage was in all 6 states. In addition, in 3 states of the 6 states, participants were significantly less likely to have access to preventative care when reported being white, non-Hispanic (Texas, New York, Ohio) and when cost precluded seeing a doctor (Georgia, California, Ohio). Overall, the findings indicate that metropolitan status was not significantly related to access to preventative care, and focus would be better placed on increasing healthcare coverage and providing free or low-cost routine checkups.

Presentation Type

Poster

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Does Access to Preventative Care Differ by Metropolitan Status for Women Aged 35-45?

The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between metropolitan status and access to preventative care. Differences in access to preventive care by metropolitan status were assessed using 2013 BRFSS data for representative samples of women ages 35-45 in 6 states while controlling for demographic characteristics. The results indicated that metropolitan status was not significantly related to access to preventative care but healthcare coverage was in all 6 states. In addition, in 3 states of the 6 states, participants were significantly less likely to have access to preventative care when reported being white, non-Hispanic (Texas, New York, Ohio) and when cost precluded seeing a doctor (Georgia, California, Ohio). Overall, the findings indicate that metropolitan status was not significantly related to access to preventative care, and focus would be better placed on increasing healthcare coverage and providing free or low-cost routine checkups.