Abstract Title

For General Health, Does Diabetes Status Differ by Veteran Status in Males Ages 25 to 45?

RAD Assignment Number

808

Presenter Name

Veronica Salaices, PA-S

Abstract

Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic medical condition in the U.S. population and in the veteran population, but little information is available for the relationship between diabetes and veteran status for different age groups. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess whether diabetes status differs by veteran status in males ages 25 to 45.

Methods: This cross sectional analysis used 2014 BRFSS data for males ages 25 to 45 from Alabama, Georgia, and Texas. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between diabetes status and veteran status, while controlling for age, ethnicity/race, weight status, mental health, heart disease, tobacco use, and alcohol use.

Results: Across states, few males ages 25-45 reported diabetes (4-7%) or veteran status (14-19%). After controlling for psychosocial and demographic factors, diabetes status was not significantly related to veteran status in any of the 3 states.

Conclusions: Overall, diabetes was not related to veteran status in representative samples of males ages 25 to 45. Additionally, the prevalence of both diabetes status and veteran status was low. The study was limited by the dichotomous measurement of the variables which did not provide additional pertinent information about their diagnosis or military role. It is recommended that clinicians screen for diabetes in this age group if there are symptoms, especially in those that are older as diabetes may become more prevalent as men age.

Research Area

Diabetes

Presentation Type

Poster

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For General Health, Does Diabetes Status Differ by Veteran Status in Males Ages 25 to 45?

Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic medical condition in the U.S. population and in the veteran population, but little information is available for the relationship between diabetes and veteran status for different age groups. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess whether diabetes status differs by veteran status in males ages 25 to 45.

Methods: This cross sectional analysis used 2014 BRFSS data for males ages 25 to 45 from Alabama, Georgia, and Texas. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between diabetes status and veteran status, while controlling for age, ethnicity/race, weight status, mental health, heart disease, tobacco use, and alcohol use.

Results: Across states, few males ages 25-45 reported diabetes (4-7%) or veteran status (14-19%). After controlling for psychosocial and demographic factors, diabetes status was not significantly related to veteran status in any of the 3 states.

Conclusions: Overall, diabetes was not related to veteran status in representative samples of males ages 25 to 45. Additionally, the prevalence of both diabetes status and veteran status was low. The study was limited by the dichotomous measurement of the variables which did not provide additional pertinent information about their diagnosis or military role. It is recommended that clinicians screen for diabetes in this age group if there are symptoms, especially in those that are older as diabetes may become more prevalent as men age.