Abstract Title

Effects of Aerobic Exercise for Children with Down Syndrome: A Systematic Review of Literature

RAD Assignment Number

2402

Presenter Name

Natalie Jay

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine evidence regarding the potential benefits of aerobic exercise for children with DS. Safety, benefits, and application are addressed.

Methods: This systematic review identified thirteen articles that met our inclusion criteria. Electronic databases used were PubMed, PEDro, CINAHL, and Scopus. Key words included Down syndrome, trisomy 21, aerobic, aerobic capacity, cardiovascular, cycling, fitness, exercise, endurance, running, and swimming. Our initial search yielded 154 potential articles, which we screened for selection criteria. In total, 464 children with DS were studied in our thirteen final research articles.

Results: A total of thirteen articles were examined and met our inclusion criteria for aerobic exercise in children with DS. Of the included articles, eleven were randomized controlled trials, one was a quasi-experimental design, and one was a cohort study. Across all 13 studies, 464 children with DS were participants. The sample size for each study ranged between 16 and 92 children. All of the studies showed a significant improvement in one or more positive outcome, including bone mineral density, body composition, pulmonary function, lower extremity muscle strength, joint kinematics, reaction time, and balance. None of the studies reported any adverse events or changes in health status during their interventions. Only two of our included studies (15%) included follow up.

Conclusions: This systematic review adds to the body of literature that supports aerobic exercise for children with DS. Studies included support the beneficial effects of aerobic exercises for children with DS. Further studies are needed to determine long term effects of any intervention. Available literature on aerobic exercise in children with DS suggests that there are beneficial effects without adverse outcomes, which means it is a reasonable treatment option for children with DS.

Research Area

Rehabilitative Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster

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Effects of Aerobic Exercise for Children with Down Syndrome: A Systematic Review of Literature

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine evidence regarding the potential benefits of aerobic exercise for children with DS. Safety, benefits, and application are addressed.

Methods: This systematic review identified thirteen articles that met our inclusion criteria. Electronic databases used were PubMed, PEDro, CINAHL, and Scopus. Key words included Down syndrome, trisomy 21, aerobic, aerobic capacity, cardiovascular, cycling, fitness, exercise, endurance, running, and swimming. Our initial search yielded 154 potential articles, which we screened for selection criteria. In total, 464 children with DS were studied in our thirteen final research articles.

Results: A total of thirteen articles were examined and met our inclusion criteria for aerobic exercise in children with DS. Of the included articles, eleven were randomized controlled trials, one was a quasi-experimental design, and one was a cohort study. Across all 13 studies, 464 children with DS were participants. The sample size for each study ranged between 16 and 92 children. All of the studies showed a significant improvement in one or more positive outcome, including bone mineral density, body composition, pulmonary function, lower extremity muscle strength, joint kinematics, reaction time, and balance. None of the studies reported any adverse events or changes in health status during their interventions. Only two of our included studies (15%) included follow up.

Conclusions: This systematic review adds to the body of literature that supports aerobic exercise for children with DS. Studies included support the beneficial effects of aerobic exercises for children with DS. Further studies are needed to determine long term effects of any intervention. Available literature on aerobic exercise in children with DS suggests that there are beneficial effects without adverse outcomes, which means it is a reasonable treatment option for children with DS.