Community Health and Prevention

Presentation Title (IN ALL CAPS)

Obese Children in U.S. - More preventive dental care than preventive medical care?

Departmental Affiliation and City, State, Zip for All Authors

Department of Epidemiology and Bio-statistics, University of North Texas Health Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107

Classification

SPH Student (For Competition)

Research Presentation Category

Community Health and Prevention

Brief Narrative or Summary

Our investigation found that obese children aged 11 to 17 years were more likely to lack preventive dental care visits than preventive medical care visits as compared to non-obese children of the same age. Obese children should be strongly encouraged for preventive dental care visits.

Scientific Abstract

Obese Children in U.S. - More preventive dental care than preventive medical care? Tarang Patel, Steven Pulvino. Department of Epidemiology and Bio-statistics, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, TX 76107. Previous studies concluded poor oral health among obese children. However, there is no strong evidence which suggests an effect of obesity on preventive dental care visits. We used National Survey of Children’s Health 2011-2012 dataset to study effect of obesity status on preventive dental care visits. We investigated the effect of obesity on preventive dental care visits among children aged 11 to 13 years (middle school) and 14 to 17 (high school). We also looked at the likelihood of receiving preventive medical care among those who were obese. Logistic regression was performed to measure the effect of obesity on preventive dental visits, and preventive medical care visits in a separate model, while controlling for age, race, poverty, insurance availability and other chronic health conditions, in both models. A significant lack of preventive dental care was observed among obese children as compared to non-obese children (OR 1.31). Children aged 14 to 17 years had 1.68 higher odds for lack of preventive dental care as compared to obese children aged 11 to 13 years. However, the odds for lack of preventive medical care was 1.09 for obese children as compared to non-obese children; this association was non-significant. Thus, a relationship was observed between obesity and lack of preventive dental care, however, the relationship between obesity and lack of preventive medical care was not significant. Further investigation may be required to measure the difference observed for medical and dental care. Our investigation suggests the need for improved efforts that strongly encourage preventive dental care among those who are obese. Key words: Preventive dental care visits, children aged 11 to 17 years, obese.

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Obese Children in U.S. - More preventive dental care than preventive medical care?

Obese Children in U.S. - More preventive dental care than preventive medical care? Tarang Patel, Steven Pulvino. Department of Epidemiology and Bio-statistics, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, TX 76107. Previous studies concluded poor oral health among obese children. However, there is no strong evidence which suggests an effect of obesity on preventive dental care visits. We used National Survey of Children’s Health 2011-2012 dataset to study effect of obesity status on preventive dental care visits. We investigated the effect of obesity on preventive dental care visits among children aged 11 to 13 years (middle school) and 14 to 17 (high school). We also looked at the likelihood of receiving preventive medical care among those who were obese. Logistic regression was performed to measure the effect of obesity on preventive dental visits, and preventive medical care visits in a separate model, while controlling for age, race, poverty, insurance availability and other chronic health conditions, in both models. A significant lack of preventive dental care was observed among obese children as compared to non-obese children (OR 1.31). Children aged 14 to 17 years had 1.68 higher odds for lack of preventive dental care as compared to obese children aged 11 to 13 years. However, the odds for lack of preventive medical care was 1.09 for obese children as compared to non-obese children; this association was non-significant. Thus, a relationship was observed between obesity and lack of preventive dental care, however, the relationship between obesity and lack of preventive medical care was not significant. Further investigation may be required to measure the difference observed for medical and dental care. Our investigation suggests the need for improved efforts that strongly encourage preventive dental care among those who are obese. Key words: Preventive dental care visits, children aged 11 to 17 years, obese.