Community Health and Prevention

Presentation Title (IN ALL CAPS)

A COMMUNITY-BASED, STUDENT FACILITATED WEIGHT MANAGEMENT PROGRAM TO IMPROVE DIETARY INTAKE IN HISPANIC YOUTH

Departmental Affiliation and City, State, Zip for All Authors

Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology; Texas Prevention Institute, UNT Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, Texas 76107

Classification

SPH Student (For Competition)

Research Presentation Category

Community Health and Prevention

Brief Narrative or Summary

The rate of overweight in Hispanic youth has increased over the last decade and is associated with a greater risk of chronic disease. A community-based weight loss program was implemented by medical and graduate students in a primarily Hispanic community to improve healthy dietary intake and manage their weights. Sixty-two eligible children aged 8 -15 years old were randomized into one of two treatment groups, a motivational and skill building weight management program as compared to a general health program, and then followed for 6 months. The 10 week curriculum in the intervention group included motivational, skill building, self-monitoring and family communication, whereas the curriculum in the control group only covered basic educational material related to a healthy lifestyle. The findings indicate that medical and graduate students can potentially deliver weight management programs effectively in high need communities.

Scientific Abstract

The rate of overweight in Hispanic youth has increased over the last decade and is associated with a greater risk of chronic disease. A community-based weight loss program was implemented by medical and graduate students in a primarily Hispanic community to improve healthy dietary intake and manage their weights. Sixty-two eligible children (BMI% ≥ 85) aged 8 -15 years old (mean age = 11 years; 52% male, 78% Hispanic) were randomized into one of two treatment groups, a motivational and skill building weight management program as compared to a general health program, and then followed for 6 months. Among those 62 children, there were 21 children who completed 24-hour dietary recalls conducted by trained dietetic students through phone interviews (Intervention, N=15; Control, N=6). The 24-hour dietary recalls collected 3 pre and 3 post daily dietary intakes, including calorie intake (in kcals), total fat intake (in grams), protein intake (in grams), carbohydrate intake (in grams), sugar intake (in grams), and dietary fiber intake (in grams). T-tests demonstrated that: Children in the intervention group significantly reduced their daily calorie intakes (p=0.02), daily total fat intakes (p=0.05), and daily sugar intakes (p=0.01) compared with control group at post 4 months. After post 4 months, BMI Z Score and BMI Percentile for children in the control group stopped to decrease, however, BMI Z Score and BMI Percentile were still significantly decreasing in the intervention group (p<0.05). These findings indicate that medical and graduate students can potentially deliver weight management programs effectively in high need communities.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

A COMMUNITY-BASED, STUDENT FACILITATED WEIGHT MANAGEMENT PROGRAM TO IMPROVE DIETARY INTAKE IN HISPANIC YOUTH

The rate of overweight in Hispanic youth has increased over the last decade and is associated with a greater risk of chronic disease. A community-based weight loss program was implemented by medical and graduate students in a primarily Hispanic community to improve healthy dietary intake and manage their weights. Sixty-two eligible children (BMI% ≥ 85) aged 8 -15 years old (mean age = 11 years; 52% male, 78% Hispanic) were randomized into one of two treatment groups, a motivational and skill building weight management program as compared to a general health program, and then followed for 6 months. Among those 62 children, there were 21 children who completed 24-hour dietary recalls conducted by trained dietetic students through phone interviews (Intervention, N=15; Control, N=6). The 24-hour dietary recalls collected 3 pre and 3 post daily dietary intakes, including calorie intake (in kcals), total fat intake (in grams), protein intake (in grams), carbohydrate intake (in grams), sugar intake (in grams), and dietary fiber intake (in grams). T-tests demonstrated that: Children in the intervention group significantly reduced their daily calorie intakes (p=0.02), daily total fat intakes (p=0.05), and daily sugar intakes (p=0.01) compared with control group at post 4 months. After post 4 months, BMI Z Score and BMI Percentile for children in the control group stopped to decrease, however, BMI Z Score and BMI Percentile were still significantly decreasing in the intervention group (p<0.05). These findings indicate that medical and graduate students can potentially deliver weight management programs effectively in high need communities.