Health Disparities

Presentation Title (IN ALL CAPS)

Social support availability predicts depression symptoms among Permanent Supportive Housing Residents

Departmental Affiliation and City, State, Zip for All Authors

Department of Public Health Education, Fort Worth, TX 76107; Department of Behavioral and Community Health, Fort Worth, TX 76107; Department of Family Medicine, Fort Worth, TX 76107; Department of Behavioral and Community Health, Fort Worth, TX 76107

Classification

SPH Student (For Competition)

Research Presentation Category

Health Disparities

Brief Narrative or Summary

The relationship between social support and mental health symptoms has been well established in the general population. However, this relationship has not been examined among permanent supportive housing (PSH) residents who may have experienced a disruption to their social network. This study investigated the reliability of a modified version of the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL), a measure of social support availability, among PSH residents participating in the Mobile Community Health Assistance for Tenants (m.chat) program. We compared ISEL scores to the PHQ-9, a commonly used measure of depression. The modified ISEL contained items from three ISEL subscales (i.e., appraisal, belonging, tangible support) and used appropriate language for the target population. Exploratory factor analysis was completed on a sample of 175 PSH residents. The ISEL items loaded onto two distinct factors: Emotional Support vs. Tangible Support. A varimax rotated factor analysis indicated the two factors accounted for 65% of the variance in the model. Factor structure was excellent (KMO = .87, Bartlett’s test of sphericity = 510.10, p < .001). Internal consistency was good (Cronbach’s alphas = 0.84-0.87). There was a significant negative association between Emotional Support and total PHQ9 scores (R2 = .390, F = 3.73, p = .004) after controlling for gender, age, and race/ethnicity (B = -1.90, SE = 0.58, t=-3.26, p=0.002). This suggests that the availability of emotional support is related to depression symptoms. Intervention efforts should focus on engaging PSH residents in social networks as a way to decrease depression symptoms.

Scientific Abstract

The relationship between social support and mental health symptoms has been well established in the general population. However, this relationship has not been examined among permanent supportive housing (PSH) residents who may have experienced a disruption to their social network. This study investigated the reliability of a modified version of the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL), a measure of social support availability, among PSH residents participating in the Mobile Community Health Assistance for Tenants (m.chat) program. We compared ISEL scores to the PHQ-9, a commonly used measure of depression. The modified ISEL contained items from three ISEL subscales (i.e., appraisal, belonging, tangible support) and used appropriate language for the target population. Exploratory factor analysis was completed on a sample of 175 PSH residents. The ISEL items loaded onto two distinct factors: Emotional Support vs. Tangible Support. A varimax rotated factor analysis indicated the two factors accounted for 65% of the variance in the model. Factor structure was excellent (KMO = .87, Bartlett’s test of sphericity = 510.10, p < .001). Internal consistency was good (Cronbach’s alphas = 0.84-0.87). There was a significant negative association between Emotional Support and total PHQ9 scores (R2 = .390, F = 3.73, p = .004) after controlling for gender, age, and race/ethnicity (B = -1.90, SE = 0.58, t=-3.26, p=0.002). This suggests that the availability of emotional support is related to depression symptoms. Intervention efforts should focus on engaging PSH residents in social networks as a way to decrease depression symptoms.

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Social support availability predicts depression symptoms among Permanent Supportive Housing Residents

The relationship between social support and mental health symptoms has been well established in the general population. However, this relationship has not been examined among permanent supportive housing (PSH) residents who may have experienced a disruption to their social network. This study investigated the reliability of a modified version of the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL), a measure of social support availability, among PSH residents participating in the Mobile Community Health Assistance for Tenants (m.chat) program. We compared ISEL scores to the PHQ-9, a commonly used measure of depression. The modified ISEL contained items from three ISEL subscales (i.e., appraisal, belonging, tangible support) and used appropriate language for the target population. Exploratory factor analysis was completed on a sample of 175 PSH residents. The ISEL items loaded onto two distinct factors: Emotional Support vs. Tangible Support. A varimax rotated factor analysis indicated the two factors accounted for 65% of the variance in the model. Factor structure was excellent (KMO = .87, Bartlett’s test of sphericity = 510.10, p < .001). Internal consistency was good (Cronbach’s alphas = 0.84-0.87). There was a significant negative association between Emotional Support and total PHQ9 scores (R2 = .390, F = 3.73, p = .004) after controlling for gender, age, and race/ethnicity (B = -1.90, SE = 0.58, t=-3.26, p=0.002). This suggests that the availability of emotional support is related to depression symptoms. Intervention efforts should focus on engaging PSH residents in social networks as a way to decrease depression symptoms.