Health Disparities

Presentation Title (IN ALL CAPS)

TESTING THE EFFICACY OF EXISTING POD (POINTS OF DISTRIBUTION) PLACEMENT FOR REDUCING ACCESS DISPARITIES IN COASTAL GEORGIA

Presenter/Author(s) Information

Suman Niranjan, Savannah State UniversityFollow

Departmental Affiliation and City, State, Zip for All Authors

209 Jordan bldg., College of Business Administration Savannah State University 3219 College St., Savannah, GA-31404

Classification

Non-UNTHSC Faculty

Research Presentation Category

Health Disparities

Brief Narrative or Summary

While all members of the population get affected by a natural disasters like hurricane, existing research shows that racial, ethnic minorities, and lower socio-economic status are likely to carry less medical supplies, less likely to evacuate due to lack of access to either private or public transportation.. Flooding situations increase the risk of infectious disease affecting a sub-group of population. The proposed study aims to measure the efficacy of the existing POD (points of Distribution) placement for coastal Georgia developed by local and state emergency agencies, and thereby proposing any necessary modifications of facility placement that will account for equal accessibility of resources to all groups of populations, thus minimizing the risk of infectious diseases outbreak.

Scientific Abstract

Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and Allison in 2011 have resulted in insurmountable physical devastation, economic loss and health impact. While all members of the population get affected by a disaster, existing research shows that racial, ethnic minorities, and members from lower socio-economic status are less likely to be prepared for such disasters, for example, likely to carry medical supplies, food or water for more than three days, less likely to evacuate due to lack of access to either private or public transportation. The unhygienic conditions, lack of proper food and clean water supply to those who stranded may result in an outbreak of diseases specifically water-borne diseases, such as diarrhea, and other infectious diseases like Tuberculosis. Savannah, GA which is the largest costal city in the state of Georgia has 50% percent African Americans and close to 30% of the residents living in poverty which could potentially imply disparity in access to health care services in pre-disaster and post-disaster situations if there is no strategic plan to distribute resources appropriately. Access to resources (which includes medical and food supply etc.) pre-disaster and post-disaster is essential for all segments of the population, which are made accessible through Points of Distribution (POD). It is extremely important that all existing PODs are validated for appropriate distribution and accessibility of resources to all groups of populations. The objective of the proposed study is to examine the existing PODs placement in Chatham County in the state of Georgia. The placement of PODs will be analyzed for its effectiveness in minimizing disparities in access to services during a natural disaster. The effectiveness of POD placement will be tested by using the REsponse PLan ANalyzer (RE-PLAN) framework developed by the University of North Texas that is designed to test disaster mitigation and evacuation plans on the basis of equal access to all sub-groups of population. The analysis will thus help note whether the current designated placement of PODs would mitigate the disparities that result from access to resources for all groups of population (race, age, and socio-economic status etc.) in Coastal Georgia region.

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TESTING THE EFFICACY OF EXISTING POD (POINTS OF DISTRIBUTION) PLACEMENT FOR REDUCING ACCESS DISPARITIES IN COASTAL GEORGIA

Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and Allison in 2011 have resulted in insurmountable physical devastation, economic loss and health impact. While all members of the population get affected by a disaster, existing research shows that racial, ethnic minorities, and members from lower socio-economic status are less likely to be prepared for such disasters, for example, likely to carry medical supplies, food or water for more than three days, less likely to evacuate due to lack of access to either private or public transportation. The unhygienic conditions, lack of proper food and clean water supply to those who stranded may result in an outbreak of diseases specifically water-borne diseases, such as diarrhea, and other infectious diseases like Tuberculosis. Savannah, GA which is the largest costal city in the state of Georgia has 50% percent African Americans and close to 30% of the residents living in poverty which could potentially imply disparity in access to health care services in pre-disaster and post-disaster situations if there is no strategic plan to distribute resources appropriately. Access to resources (which includes medical and food supply etc.) pre-disaster and post-disaster is essential for all segments of the population, which are made accessible through Points of Distribution (POD). It is extremely important that all existing PODs are validated for appropriate distribution and accessibility of resources to all groups of populations. The objective of the proposed study is to examine the existing PODs placement in Chatham County in the state of Georgia. The placement of PODs will be analyzed for its effectiveness in minimizing disparities in access to services during a natural disaster. The effectiveness of POD placement will be tested by using the REsponse PLan ANalyzer (RE-PLAN) framework developed by the University of North Texas that is designed to test disaster mitigation and evacuation plans on the basis of equal access to all sub-groups of population. The analysis will thus help note whether the current designated placement of PODs would mitigate the disparities that result from access to resources for all groups of population (race, age, and socio-economic status etc.) in Coastal Georgia region.