Health Disparities

Presentation Title (IN ALL CAPS)

DIETARY AND LIFESTYLE CHANGES IN RELATION TO NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES: PERCEPTIONS OF AFRICAN AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN REFUGEES RESETTLED IN TARRANT COUNTY

Presenter/Author(s) Information

Neneh N. Wurie, Catholic Charities Fort WorthFollow

Departmental Affiliation and City, State, Zip for All Authors

Specialized Services, Fort Worth, TX 76115

Classification

Other

Research Presentation Category

Health Disparities

Brief Narrative or Summary

To explore Tarrant County African and Southeast Asian refugees' perception of the connection between dietary habits and non-communicable diseases and to utilize information obtained to develop sustainable nutrition education programs.

Scientific Abstract

DIETARY AND LIFESTYLE CHANGES IN RELATION TO NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES: PERCEPTIONS OF AFRICAN AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN REFUGEES RESETTLED IN TARRANT COUNTY Neneh N. Wurie Department of Specialized Services, Catholic Charities Fort Worth, 249 W. Thornhill Drive, Fort Worth, TX 76115 African and Southeast Asian refugees are at heightened risks for non-communicable diseases namely- diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease; with obesity and overweight being contributing factors. Compared to their Middle-Eastern counterparts, this population experiences significant weight gain over a short period; normally within two years upon arrival to the United States. With these implications, it is imperative to explore African and Southeast Asian Refugees of Tarrant County’s dietary and lifestyle changes and their perceptions of NCDs in order to implement sustainable wellness education programs for healthy and successful lives in the United States. This study aims to build a coalition that will address the health of refugees; explore dietary and lifestyle changes among Tarrant County African and Southeast Asian Refugees post-resettlement, and examine this population’s perception of non-communicable diseases as related to their food/diet; and utilize these results to develop a culturally appropriate, nutrition education program for refugees. The coalition will be formed using the community-based participatory approach due to this approach’s successful research outcomes pertaining to health disparities, refugee health, and nutrition. Refugee community groups, various social service agencies, resettlement agencies, local hospitals, and universities involved with refugee health will be invited to join this coalition. Overall, this study is critical in implementing a culturally and linguistically sensitive health and wellness program that will educate on eating food groups similar to those consumed pre-resettlement and promote increase in physical activity, providing a much-needed sustainable solution that is culturally appropriate for new Tarrant County African and Southeast Asian refugee populations. Keywords: Refugee health, nutrition, non-communicable diseases

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DIETARY AND LIFESTYLE CHANGES IN RELATION TO NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES: PERCEPTIONS OF AFRICAN AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN REFUGEES RESETTLED IN TARRANT COUNTY

DIETARY AND LIFESTYLE CHANGES IN RELATION TO NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES: PERCEPTIONS OF AFRICAN AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN REFUGEES RESETTLED IN TARRANT COUNTY Neneh N. Wurie Department of Specialized Services, Catholic Charities Fort Worth, 249 W. Thornhill Drive, Fort Worth, TX 76115 African and Southeast Asian refugees are at heightened risks for non-communicable diseases namely- diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease; with obesity and overweight being contributing factors. Compared to their Middle-Eastern counterparts, this population experiences significant weight gain over a short period; normally within two years upon arrival to the United States. With these implications, it is imperative to explore African and Southeast Asian Refugees of Tarrant County’s dietary and lifestyle changes and their perceptions of NCDs in order to implement sustainable wellness education programs for healthy and successful lives in the United States. This study aims to build a coalition that will address the health of refugees; explore dietary and lifestyle changes among Tarrant County African and Southeast Asian Refugees post-resettlement, and examine this population’s perception of non-communicable diseases as related to their food/diet; and utilize these results to develop a culturally appropriate, nutrition education program for refugees. The coalition will be formed using the community-based participatory approach due to this approach’s successful research outcomes pertaining to health disparities, refugee health, and nutrition. Refugee community groups, various social service agencies, resettlement agencies, local hospitals, and universities involved with refugee health will be invited to join this coalition. Overall, this study is critical in implementing a culturally and linguistically sensitive health and wellness program that will educate on eating food groups similar to those consumed pre-resettlement and promote increase in physical activity, providing a much-needed sustainable solution that is culturally appropriate for new Tarrant County African and Southeast Asian refugee populations. Keywords: Refugee health, nutrition, non-communicable diseases