Presentation Title (IN ALL CAPS)

MULTI-STEP AGE VERIFICATION: A POINT-OF-SALE, POPULATION-LEVEL TOBACCO CONTROL INTERVENTION TO REDUCE CIGARETTE SALES TO UNDERAGE YOUTH

Departmental Affiliation and City, State, Zip for All Authors

School of Public Health, Department of Health Management and Policy, Fort Worth, Texas 76107

Classification

UNTHSC Faculty

Research Presentation Category

Community Health and Prevention

Brief Narrative or Summary

This study will investigate whether requiring more than one form of identification when seeking to verify the age of cigarette purchasers will enhance tobacco control enforcement efforts by limiting commercial access to cigarettes for underage youth and reduce their illegal use of cigarettes.

Scientific Abstract

Although cigarette smoking is a leading cause of preventable disease and death in the United States, approximately 3,200 underage youth in the United States start to smoke cigarettes each day. Despite laws that restrict youth access to tobacco, children under 18 years of age are still able to purchase cigarettes each day on the same basis as adults, making cigarette purchase attempts (CPA) a regular source of their cigarettes. Multi-step age verification (MSAV) may be an effective alternative to current tobacco control efforts, whereby convenience stores require two forms of identification instead of one. Using MSAV as an intervention to decrease CPA represents one potentially efficacious approach to enhancing youth access to tobacco (YATT) law enforcement and has a secondary effect of reducing self-reports of current smoking by underage youth. Our central hypothesis is that at the end of the study schools located near MSAV retailers will have lower cigarette use in terms of quantity and frequency compared to those who are not. Our hypothesis will be tested by four specific aims which are directed at understanding: (1) the efficacy of MSAV in the prevention of CPA; (2) whether retailer participation be maintained throughout the pilot project; (3) whether MSAV lowers CPA; and (4) what if any effect MSAV has on the current cigarette use of underage youth. Participants will include 50 convenience stores and 50 middle or high school within proximity of a convenience. Convenience stores will be randomly assigned to either to the MSAV intervention or a control group. Both groups will complete FDA/CTP training, but only the MSAV intervention group will require two forms of identification for cigarette purchases. We expect that the results of this study will establish the MSAV intervention as efficacious for reducing youth access to tobacco (YATT) and will produce valuable scientific knowledge regarding the how to improve YATT enforcement. The significance to public health for this project lies in the insights gained from the intervention and its potential for adapting the MSAV intervention for future use in other populations, locations, or settings; for use in conjunction with other tobacco control efforts; and in the hope of ending youth access to tobacco.

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MULTI-STEP AGE VERIFICATION: A POINT-OF-SALE, POPULATION-LEVEL TOBACCO CONTROL INTERVENTION TO REDUCE CIGARETTE SALES TO UNDERAGE YOUTH

Although cigarette smoking is a leading cause of preventable disease and death in the United States, approximately 3,200 underage youth in the United States start to smoke cigarettes each day. Despite laws that restrict youth access to tobacco, children under 18 years of age are still able to purchase cigarettes each day on the same basis as adults, making cigarette purchase attempts (CPA) a regular source of their cigarettes. Multi-step age verification (MSAV) may be an effective alternative to current tobacco control efforts, whereby convenience stores require two forms of identification instead of one. Using MSAV as an intervention to decrease CPA represents one potentially efficacious approach to enhancing youth access to tobacco (YATT) law enforcement and has a secondary effect of reducing self-reports of current smoking by underage youth. Our central hypothesis is that at the end of the study schools located near MSAV retailers will have lower cigarette use in terms of quantity and frequency compared to those who are not. Our hypothesis will be tested by four specific aims which are directed at understanding: (1) the efficacy of MSAV in the prevention of CPA; (2) whether retailer participation be maintained throughout the pilot project; (3) whether MSAV lowers CPA; and (4) what if any effect MSAV has on the current cigarette use of underage youth. Participants will include 50 convenience stores and 50 middle or high school within proximity of a convenience. Convenience stores will be randomly assigned to either to the MSAV intervention or a control group. Both groups will complete FDA/CTP training, but only the MSAV intervention group will require two forms of identification for cigarette purchases. We expect that the results of this study will establish the MSAV intervention as efficacious for reducing youth access to tobacco (YATT) and will produce valuable scientific knowledge regarding the how to improve YATT enforcement. The significance to public health for this project lies in the insights gained from the intervention and its potential for adapting the MSAV intervention for future use in other populations, locations, or settings; for use in conjunction with other tobacco control efforts; and in the hope of ending youth access to tobacco.