Presentation Title (IN ALL CAPS)

KNOWLEDGE AND USE OF ELECTRONIC CIGARETTES AT TEXAS HBCUS

Departmental Affiliation and City, State, Zip for All Authors

Steps Toward Academic Research (STAR) Fellowship Texas Center for Health Disparities University of North Texas Health Science Center Ft. Wort, TX 76107

Classification

Postdoctoral Fellow

Research Presentation Category

Community Health and Prevention

Brief Narrative or Summary

As a consequence to the deficiency of significant scientific proof of harmful health effects caused by electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), there is an absence of prevention programs to protect many at-risk populations from being targeted by e-cigarette companies (Franck, 2014). In comparison to other Texas colleges and universities, many historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in Texas are located in low-income communities (Tobacco Free Campus, 2015). Therefore, Texas HBCU students could be at risk for high exposure to advertising and availability of e-cigarettes. Additionally, African Americans, which typically start using tobacco at an older age than Anglo Americans, are disproportionately susceptible to tobacco-caused mortality (Roberts, 2016; Bach 2015). As a step in attaining the long-term goal of reducing the health disparity of tobacco-caused mortality among African Americans in Texas, the objective of this proposal is to assess the knowledge and use of e-cigarettes among college-aged, rather than high school-aged, African Americans attending Texas HBCUs. To accomplish our objective we will: 1. Survey students about their experiences with e-cigarettes; 2. Organize and disseminate literature on e-cigarettes 3. Produce a peer-educator toolkit. Completion of these aims will result in positive translational impact by increasing awareness about the health risks caused by e-cigarettes and generating needed data concerning the use of e-cigarettes. Arguments will be fostered for improved e-cigarette components, enhanced regulation of e-cigarette advertising, and increased FDA e-cigarette warning labeling. Additionally, peer-educators will gain community leadership skills and interests in improving health outcomes in their circles of influence.

Scientific Abstract

As a consequence to the deficiency of significant scientific proof of harmful health effects caused by electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), there is an absence of prevention programs to protect many at-risk populations from being targeted by e-cigarette companies (Franck, 2014). In comparison to other Texas colleges and universities, many historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in Texas are located in low-income communities (Tobacco Free Campus, 2015). Therefore, Texas HBCU students could be at risk for high exposure to advertising and availability of e-cigarettes. Additionally, African Americans, which typically start using tobacco at an older age than Anglo Americans, are disproportionately susceptible to tobacco-caused mortality (Roberts, 2016; Bach 2015). As a step in attaining the long-term goal of reducing the health disparity of tobacco-caused mortality among African Americans in Texas, the objective of this proposal is to assess the knowledge and use of e-cigarettes among college-aged, rather than high school-aged, African Americans attending Texas HBCUs. To accomplish our objective we will: 1. Survey students about their experiences with e-cigarettes; 2. Organize and disseminate literature on e-cigarettes 3. Produce a peer-educator toolkit. Completion of these aims will result in positive translational impact by increasing awareness about the health risks caused by e-cigarettes and generating needed data concerning the use of e-cigarettes. Arguments will be fostered for improved e-cigarette components, enhanced regulation of e-cigarette advertising, and increased FDA e-cigarette warning labeling. Additionally, peer-educators will gain community leadership skills and interests in improving health outcomes in their circles of influence.

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KNOWLEDGE AND USE OF ELECTRONIC CIGARETTES AT TEXAS HBCUS

As a consequence to the deficiency of significant scientific proof of harmful health effects caused by electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), there is an absence of prevention programs to protect many at-risk populations from being targeted by e-cigarette companies (Franck, 2014). In comparison to other Texas colleges and universities, many historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in Texas are located in low-income communities (Tobacco Free Campus, 2015). Therefore, Texas HBCU students could be at risk for high exposure to advertising and availability of e-cigarettes. Additionally, African Americans, which typically start using tobacco at an older age than Anglo Americans, are disproportionately susceptible to tobacco-caused mortality (Roberts, 2016; Bach 2015). As a step in attaining the long-term goal of reducing the health disparity of tobacco-caused mortality among African Americans in Texas, the objective of this proposal is to assess the knowledge and use of e-cigarettes among college-aged, rather than high school-aged, African Americans attending Texas HBCUs. To accomplish our objective we will: 1. Survey students about their experiences with e-cigarettes; 2. Organize and disseminate literature on e-cigarettes 3. Produce a peer-educator toolkit. Completion of these aims will result in positive translational impact by increasing awareness about the health risks caused by e-cigarettes and generating needed data concerning the use of e-cigarettes. Arguments will be fostered for improved e-cigarette components, enhanced regulation of e-cigarette advertising, and increased FDA e-cigarette warning labeling. Additionally, peer-educators will gain community leadership skills and interests in improving health outcomes in their circles of influence.