Presentation Title (IN ALL CAPS)

Advancing Language Access Services in Hays, KS: A CLAS-Consistent Medical Interpreting Program.

Departmental Affiliation and City, State, Zip for All Authors

Modern Languages Department Hays, KS 67601

Classification

Non-UNTHSC Faculty

Research Presentation Category

Community Health and Prevention

Brief Narrative or Summary

Patients and families with limited English proficiency (LEP) face a multitude of health barriers. These barriers can contribute to difficulty accessing care and understanding or adhering to treatment recommendations, ultimately placing them at higher risk for poorer outcomes than their English-speaking counterparts (Gil et al., 2015). In multilingual settings it is common practice to use untrained bilingual hospital staff, family members, and/or minors to serve as ad-hoc interpreters, seriously compromising the health outcomes of LEP patients (Patel et al. 2016, Silva et al. 2015, Diamond 2010). In April 2013, the Office of Minority Health released the enhanced National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services in Health and Health Care (the National CLAS Standards). The CLAS standards, are intended to advance health equity, improve quality, and help eliminate health disparities among limited-English-proficiency (LEP) patients. My objective is to develop and implement a CLAS-consistent medical interpreting program at the college level in Hays, KS. The contribution of this project will be significant because it is expected to formalize a community-based education program which promotes civic mindedness and foster among students a deeper understanding of community health challenges. Keywords: Medical interpreters, Hispanics, language barriers.

Scientific Abstract

Advancing Language Access Services in Hays, KS: A CLAS-Consistent Medical Interpreting Program. Rosa-Maria Castaneda Department of Modern Languages, Fort Hays State University, 600 Park St. Hays, KS 67601. Patients and families with limited English proficiency (LEP) face a multitude of health barriers. These barriers can contribute to difficulty accessing care and understanding or adhering to treatment recommendations, ultimately placing them at higher risk for poorer outcomes than their English-speaking counterparts (Gil et al., 2015). In multilingual settings it is common practice to use untrained bilingual hospital staff, family members, and/or minors to serve as ad-hoc interpreters, seriously compromising the health outcomes of LEP patients (Patel et al. 2016, Silva et al. 2015, Diamond 2010). In April 2013, the Office of Minority Health released the enhanced National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services in Health and Health Care (the National CLAS Standards). The CLAS standards, are intended to advance health equity, improve quality, and help eliminate health disparities among limited-English-proficiency (LEP) patients. My objective is to develop and implement a CLAS-consistent medical interpreting program at the college level in Hays, KS. The contribution of this project will be significant because it is expected to formalize a community-based education program which promotes civic mindedness and foster among students a deeper understanding of community health challenges. Keywords: Medical interpreters, Hispanics, language barriers.

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Advancing Language Access Services in Hays, KS: A CLAS-Consistent Medical Interpreting Program.

Advancing Language Access Services in Hays, KS: A CLAS-Consistent Medical Interpreting Program. Rosa-Maria Castaneda Department of Modern Languages, Fort Hays State University, 600 Park St. Hays, KS 67601. Patients and families with limited English proficiency (LEP) face a multitude of health barriers. These barriers can contribute to difficulty accessing care and understanding or adhering to treatment recommendations, ultimately placing them at higher risk for poorer outcomes than their English-speaking counterparts (Gil et al., 2015). In multilingual settings it is common practice to use untrained bilingual hospital staff, family members, and/or minors to serve as ad-hoc interpreters, seriously compromising the health outcomes of LEP patients (Patel et al. 2016, Silva et al. 2015, Diamond 2010). In April 2013, the Office of Minority Health released the enhanced National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services in Health and Health Care (the National CLAS Standards). The CLAS standards, are intended to advance health equity, improve quality, and help eliminate health disparities among limited-English-proficiency (LEP) patients. My objective is to develop and implement a CLAS-consistent medical interpreting program at the college level in Hays, KS. The contribution of this project will be significant because it is expected to formalize a community-based education program which promotes civic mindedness and foster among students a deeper understanding of community health challenges. Keywords: Medical interpreters, Hispanics, language barriers.