Presentation Title (IN ALL CAPS)

Health Disparities and Novel Biomarkers for HIV-1 Disease Progression

Departmental Affiliation and City, State, Zip for All Authors

Cell Biology and Immunology Department, Fort worth, Texas, 76107; Cell Biology and Immunology Department, Fort worth, Texas, 76107, Biostatistic Department, Fort worth, Texas, 76107; Family Medicine Department, Fort worth, Texas, 76107

Classification

Other

Research Presentation Category

Health Disparities

Brief Narrative or Summary

37 million people are living with diagnosed HIV worldwide and 1.1 million people in the United States living with HIV infection In the United States the burden of illness falls disproportionately on ethnic/racial minorities with 42% being African American and 21% being Hispanic. Texas is third in the Nation for number of diagnosed HIV cases (approximately 22.1% living with HIV) Majority of the persons living with HIV in Texas are racial/ethnic minorities with 70% African Americans, 22.9% Hispanics and 10.1% Caucasians People aged 50 and over accounted for 18% of HIV diagnoses in the United States of which 44% were among those aged 50 to 54 (59.3% African Americans, 23.3% Hispanics, 8.7% Caucasian). After ART- HIV-1-Associated Dementia incidence decreased, but not prevalence – AIDS defining (2-8%). HIV-1-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders: milder forms of cognitive, behavior and motor dysfunctions increasing (30-60%). We hypothesize that sCD40L, biomarkers and disease parameters of inflammation correlate with the level of neurological impairment & these factors may vary in individuals living with HIV/AIDS dependent on their age, gender, racial/ethnic background and disease progression.

Scientific Abstract

Background: The World Health Organization data reports, approximately thirty seven million people are living with a diagnosed HIV infection worldwide, and more than a million in the United States. With greater life expectancy from antiretroviral therapy people aged fifty five and older accounted for one quarter of all Americans living with a diagnosed HIV infection. In the United States the burden of illness falls disproportionately on ethnic/racial minorities with 42% being African American and 21% being Hispanic. We propose biomarkers including sCD40L, correlate with the level of neurological impairment and these factors may vary in individuals living with HIV/AIDS dependent on their age, gender, racial/ethnic background and disease progression. Methods: HIV-1 seropositive Caucasian, African American and Hispanic men and women (20 in each category) older than 20 years were recruited from clinics in Dallas- Fort Worth metroplex area. The study visit included informed consent, drug screening, HIV-1 relevant medical history review, socio-demographic survey, neurocognitive assessment (CNS vital signs) and blood sampling. Patients will be followed up for a second visit a year later. Patient samples were isolated for biomarker analysis. Results: Preliminary screening of whole plasma samples from participants showed observable levels for sCD40L and other inflammatory biomarkers, which correlated with the socio-demographic and neurocognitive test data for all first visit subjects. Episomal 2-LTR circles were also tested and are important markers for ongoing viral replication and viral latency. Conclusion: Pro-inflammatory biomarker levels can be accurately measured in patient plasma samples to correlate between different gender, racial/ethnic background and disease progression. HIV-1 cDNA levels can be a useful tool in monitoring therapy in HIV-1 infected individuals. We expect to obtain and verify trends in immune biomarkers in context of race/ethnic backgrounds.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Health Disparities and Novel Biomarkers for HIV-1 Disease Progression

Background: The World Health Organization data reports, approximately thirty seven million people are living with a diagnosed HIV infection worldwide, and more than a million in the United States. With greater life expectancy from antiretroviral therapy people aged fifty five and older accounted for one quarter of all Americans living with a diagnosed HIV infection. In the United States the burden of illness falls disproportionately on ethnic/racial minorities with 42% being African American and 21% being Hispanic. We propose biomarkers including sCD40L, correlate with the level of neurological impairment and these factors may vary in individuals living with HIV/AIDS dependent on their age, gender, racial/ethnic background and disease progression. Methods: HIV-1 seropositive Caucasian, African American and Hispanic men and women (20 in each category) older than 20 years were recruited from clinics in Dallas- Fort Worth metroplex area. The study visit included informed consent, drug screening, HIV-1 relevant medical history review, socio-demographic survey, neurocognitive assessment (CNS vital signs) and blood sampling. Patients will be followed up for a second visit a year later. Patient samples were isolated for biomarker analysis. Results: Preliminary screening of whole plasma samples from participants showed observable levels for sCD40L and other inflammatory biomarkers, which correlated with the socio-demographic and neurocognitive test data for all first visit subjects. Episomal 2-LTR circles were also tested and are important markers for ongoing viral replication and viral latency. Conclusion: Pro-inflammatory biomarker levels can be accurately measured in patient plasma samples to correlate between different gender, racial/ethnic background and disease progression. HIV-1 cDNA levels can be a useful tool in monitoring therapy in HIV-1 infected individuals. We expect to obtain and verify trends in immune biomarkers in context of race/ethnic backgrounds.