Date of Award

12-1-1999

Degree Type

Restricted Access Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Public Health

Field of Study

Epidemiology

Department

School of Public Health

First Advisor

Sally Blakley

Second Advisor

Antonio A. Rene

Abstract

Braun, LeeAnn, Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Body Mass Index and All-Cause Mortality in Women, Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study, 1970-1994. Master of Public Health (Epidemiology), December, 1999, 44 p.p., 9 tables, references, 24 titles. Cardiorespiratory fitness and body mass index are related to morbidity and mortality (Manson, 1996). There is a preponderance of evidence supporting this relation in men (Gibbons, 1983; Blair, 1989, 1995, 1996; Lee, I, 1993; Barlow, 1995; Kampert, 1996; Dorn, 1997; Lee, C, 1999). The evaluation of the stated risk factors have been virtually unexplored in a cohort of women. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether higher levels of cardiorespiratory fitness attenuate the risk of all-cause mortality in overweight and obese women. In this prospective study, the study population consisted of 7572 women ages 20-89 years, who had a medical examination and achieved at least 85% of their age-adjusted maximal heart rate during a maximal treadmill test were followed for 69,979 woman-years. After adjustment for age, exam year, health status and smoking status, unfit women had a higher risk for all-cause mortality across BMI categories [RR 1.70 95% CI (1.18, 2.43)]. The benefits of cardiorespiratory fitness significantly decrease the risk of all-cause mortality in women as the concurrent consideration of cardiorespiratory fitness.

Comments

Braun, LeeAnn, Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Body Mass Index and All-Cause Mortality in Women, Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study, 1970-1994. Master of Public Health (Epidemiology), December, 1999, 44 p.p., 9 tables, references, 24 titles. W 4.5 B825C 1999

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