Date of Award

5-1-2006

Degree Type

Restricted Access Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Field of Study

Clinical Research and Education: Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine

Department

Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

First Advisor

Scott Stoll

Second Advisor

des Anges Cruser

Third Advisor

John Licciardone

Abstract

Pickett, Carolyn M., D.O., M.S. Does Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment Improve Dyspnea and Exercise Tolerance in Subjects with Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease? Master of Science (Clinical Research and Education – OMM), May 2006, 54 pages, 10 tables, 4 figures, references 48 titles. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death globally and is projected to increase. This highly prevalent and costly disease causes reduced physical and social functioning, and none of the existing medications for COPD seem to modify long-term decline in lung function. COPD patients with the severe dyspnea have more deficits in the health status and energy. Reduced functional status has been significantly correlated with health related quality of life. Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT) has been suggested for treatment of COPD as early as 1902, some research indicates that OMT may improve dyspnea and exercise tolerance, yet there are few published studies on OMT and COPD. Study goals were to increase scientific knowledge about how OMT may immediately improve dyspnea and exercise tolerance in stable COPD following exertion. This RCT was approved by the Institutional Review Board at the University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTHSC) in Fort Worth and funded by the Osteopathic Research Center (ORC) at UNTHSC. –Hypothesis 1: A single intervention of OMT will improve dyspnea in a stable COPD subject, as measured by response to the Borg scale with exertion, when compared to no treatment. –Hypothesis: a single intervention of OMT will improve exercise tolerance in a stable COPD subject, as measured by distance walked during the six-minute walk test, when compared to no treatment. Twenty-one subjects completed the trial, 10 in the OMT group and 11 in the no-treatment group. No significant differences were found in the Borg scale or 6MWT following OMT. This study is limited by a small sample size and single OMT intervention design; however, it does demonstrate the feasibility of this research at this institution and may lead to a larger, more definitive and funded clinical trial.

Comments

Pickett, Carolyn M., D.O., M.S. Does Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment Improve Dyspnea and Exercise Tolerance in Subjects with Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease? Master of Science (Clinical Research and Education – OMM), May 2006, 54 pages, 10 tables, 4 figures, references 48 titles W 4.5 P597D 2006

Share

COinS