Abstract Title

For General Health, is Heavy Alcohol Use Related to Heart Disease in Adult Woman Aged 45-64?

Presenter Name

Jamie Williams

RAD Assignment Number

425

Abstract

Introduction: Heart disease and general alcohol use are leading health concerns in the general population, but little is known about the relationship between heart disease and heavy alcohol use in women aged 45-64. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between heavy alcohol use and heart disease in middle-aged women.

Methods: This cross sectional analysis used 2014 BRFSS data for females ages 45-64 from Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, and West Virginia. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between lifetime heart disease and heavy alcohol use while controlling for age, ethnicity, marital status, income level, exercise, weight status, diabetes, and tobacco use.

Results: A small percentage of female participants aged 45-64 reported lifetime heart disease (6-8%) or heavy alcohol use (2-6%). After controlling for demographic factors, heart disease was not significantly related to heavy alcohol use in any of the four states. However, heart disease was significantly related to exercise in AR, KY, and WV, and significantly related to diabetes in KY and LA.

Conclusions: In summary, heart disease was not significantly related to heavy alcohol use but was significantly related to exercise and diabetes in general population samples of women aged 45-64. Although this study was limited by poorly defined variable measurements and a lack of direction of influence, it is recommended that primary care providers screen and educate their middle-aged female patients on the relationship between heart disease, exercise and diabetes. Given low prevalence of heart disease in the target population and lack of significant relationship between heart disease and heavy alcohol use, it is not indicated to screen for heart disease and heavy alcohol use in every middle-aged woman. Screening for either is recommended if the patient presents with symptoms.

Research Area

Cardiovascular

Presentation Type

Poster

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For General Health, is Heavy Alcohol Use Related to Heart Disease in Adult Woman Aged 45-64?

Introduction: Heart disease and general alcohol use are leading health concerns in the general population, but little is known about the relationship between heart disease and heavy alcohol use in women aged 45-64. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between heavy alcohol use and heart disease in middle-aged women.

Methods: This cross sectional analysis used 2014 BRFSS data for females ages 45-64 from Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, and West Virginia. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between lifetime heart disease and heavy alcohol use while controlling for age, ethnicity, marital status, income level, exercise, weight status, diabetes, and tobacco use.

Results: A small percentage of female participants aged 45-64 reported lifetime heart disease (6-8%) or heavy alcohol use (2-6%). After controlling for demographic factors, heart disease was not significantly related to heavy alcohol use in any of the four states. However, heart disease was significantly related to exercise in AR, KY, and WV, and significantly related to diabetes in KY and LA.

Conclusions: In summary, heart disease was not significantly related to heavy alcohol use but was significantly related to exercise and diabetes in general population samples of women aged 45-64. Although this study was limited by poorly defined variable measurements and a lack of direction of influence, it is recommended that primary care providers screen and educate their middle-aged female patients on the relationship between heart disease, exercise and diabetes. Given low prevalence of heart disease in the target population and lack of significant relationship between heart disease and heavy alcohol use, it is not indicated to screen for heart disease and heavy alcohol use in every middle-aged woman. Screening for either is recommended if the patient presents with symptoms.