Abstract Title

Is Depression a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease in Middle-Aged Women?

Presenter Name

Samantha B. Foley, PA-S

RAD Assignment Number

408

Abstract

Introduction: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and depression are prevalent morbidities found in middle aged adults; however, the association between depression and cardiovascular disease remains largely understudied in middle-aged females. The purpose of this study was to assess whether depression is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in middle-aged women 40-65 years old.

Methods: This cross-sectional analysis used 2014 data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for females ages 40-65 in Alabama (N=2621), Louisiana (N=2025), Mississippi (N=1251), and Tennessee (N=1528). Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between depression and cardiovascular disease, after adjusting for age, ethnicity/race, exercise, diabetes, alcohol use, tobacco use, and marital status.

Results: Few participants in the target population reported they were ever diagnosed with angina or coronary heart disease (5-6%) or ever diagnosed with any form of depression or dysthymia (26-31%). After controlling for demographic, psychosocial, and behavioral factors depression was significantly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in two of fours states. In addition, diabetes and age (55-65) were related to CVD in two of four states.

Conclusions: These findings suggest depression may increase the risk for CVD in middle-aged women in the general population. This cross-sectional study could not determine the direction of the relationship between depression and cardiovascular disease. Although CVD and depression are not prevalent in the general population, it is still recommended that practitioners screen, educate, and provide referral services as necessary.

Research Area

Cardiovascular

Presentation Type

Poster

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Is Depression a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease in Middle-Aged Women?

Introduction: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and depression are prevalent morbidities found in middle aged adults; however, the association between depression and cardiovascular disease remains largely understudied in middle-aged females. The purpose of this study was to assess whether depression is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in middle-aged women 40-65 years old.

Methods: This cross-sectional analysis used 2014 data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for females ages 40-65 in Alabama (N=2621), Louisiana (N=2025), Mississippi (N=1251), and Tennessee (N=1528). Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between depression and cardiovascular disease, after adjusting for age, ethnicity/race, exercise, diabetes, alcohol use, tobacco use, and marital status.

Results: Few participants in the target population reported they were ever diagnosed with angina or coronary heart disease (5-6%) or ever diagnosed with any form of depression or dysthymia (26-31%). After controlling for demographic, psychosocial, and behavioral factors depression was significantly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in two of fours states. In addition, diabetes and age (55-65) were related to CVD in two of four states.

Conclusions: These findings suggest depression may increase the risk for CVD in middle-aged women in the general population. This cross-sectional study could not determine the direction of the relationship between depression and cardiovascular disease. Although CVD and depression are not prevalent in the general population, it is still recommended that practitioners screen, educate, and provide referral services as necessary.