Abstract Title

Is Diabetes a Risk Factor for Stroke in Women Ages 45-54?

Presenter Name

Hannah Turner

RAD Assignment Number

1210

Abstract

Introduction: Diabetes has been identified as a risk factor for stroke. However, there is little known about the relationship between stroke and diabetes by gender and specific age groups. The purpose of this study was to assess whether diabetes is a risk factor for stroke in women ages 45-54.

Methods: This cross-sectional analysis used 2014 BRFSS data for females ages 45-54 in Arkansas, Kentucky, Maryland, South Carolina, and West Virginia. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between stroke and diabetes, while controlling for alcohol use, education level, ethnicity/race, exercise, tobacco use, and weight status.

Results: Few women ages 45-54 reported ever being diagnosed with stroke (3-6%) or diabetes (10-17%). After controlling for alcohol use, education level, ethnicity/race, exercise, tobacco use, and weight status, diabetes was significantly related to stroke in Kentucky (AOR=2.92, 95% CI=1.40, 6.09) and Maryland (AOR=3.32, 95% CI=1.07, 10.3) but not in Arkansas, South Carolina, and West Virginia.

Conclusions: Diabetes was found to be significantly related to stroke in two out of five states. This cross-sectional study does not reflect previous history of stroke and diabetes or their comorbidities. Since this data was from a population-based study, the results may reflect patients in the primary care setting. Therefore, practitioners in primary care can expect to see a very low percentages of stroke and diabetic patients and may consider screening for diabetes or stroke in patients with signs and symptoms of either disease.

Research Area

General Medicine

Presentation Type

Poster

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Is Diabetes a Risk Factor for Stroke in Women Ages 45-54?

Introduction: Diabetes has been identified as a risk factor for stroke. However, there is little known about the relationship between stroke and diabetes by gender and specific age groups. The purpose of this study was to assess whether diabetes is a risk factor for stroke in women ages 45-54.

Methods: This cross-sectional analysis used 2014 BRFSS data for females ages 45-54 in Arkansas, Kentucky, Maryland, South Carolina, and West Virginia. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between stroke and diabetes, while controlling for alcohol use, education level, ethnicity/race, exercise, tobacco use, and weight status.

Results: Few women ages 45-54 reported ever being diagnosed with stroke (3-6%) or diabetes (10-17%). After controlling for alcohol use, education level, ethnicity/race, exercise, tobacco use, and weight status, diabetes was significantly related to stroke in Kentucky (AOR=2.92, 95% CI=1.40, 6.09) and Maryland (AOR=3.32, 95% CI=1.07, 10.3) but not in Arkansas, South Carolina, and West Virginia.

Conclusions: Diabetes was found to be significantly related to stroke in two out of five states. This cross-sectional study does not reflect previous history of stroke and diabetes or their comorbidities. Since this data was from a population-based study, the results may reflect patients in the primary care setting. Therefore, practitioners in primary care can expect to see a very low percentages of stroke and diabetic patients and may consider screening for diabetes or stroke in patients with signs and symptoms of either disease.