Abstract Title

An Evaluation of Attitudes and Understanding of Vaccinations in Rural Populations

Presenter Name

Deepika Kaushal

RAD Assignment Number

1914

Abstract

Background: Recently in the media, there has been a movement to abstain from childhood immunizations. At the same time, a rise in the rate of preventable childhood diseases for which there are available immunizations has also been witnessed. It is known that the attitude towards vaccination of both the parents and providers and the knowledge about vaccines all influence vaccination compliance.

Methods: My colleagues and I surveyed rural communities in Texas to assess parental knowledge and how that affected vaccination compliance. Clifton, Texas is located in Bosque County. As of the census of 2000, there were 3,542 people. Plainview, Texas is located in Hale County. The current census data reports a population of 22,194. Bilingual versions of surveys developed by Zingg et al were distributed to participants with children up to 10 years of age who live in or near the rural towns of Clifton or Plainview between the fall of 2015 and the spring of 2016.

Results: When analyzing survey results, correct knowledge was estimated by summing over the number of correct answers for the 11 items in the survey. Using a multiple linear regression model our study revealed that here is statistically significant difference in knowledge on vaccination for parents who has a Bachelor degree or more in comparison to parents who are high school graduate or less after adjusting for the effects of race and number of children. However, there is no statistically significant difference in knowledge on vaccination for parents who has some college degree in comparison to parents who are high school graduate or less after adjusting for the effects of race and number of children.

Conclusions: On an average, parent’s knowledge on vaccination increases as their number of children increases after adjusting for the effects of educational status and race. There is no statistical difference on vaccination knowledge in White versus Hispanic and White versus Other racial groups after adjusting for the effects of parent’s education and number of children.

Research Area

Other

Presentation Type

Poster

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An Evaluation of Attitudes and Understanding of Vaccinations in Rural Populations

Background: Recently in the media, there has been a movement to abstain from childhood immunizations. At the same time, a rise in the rate of preventable childhood diseases for which there are available immunizations has also been witnessed. It is known that the attitude towards vaccination of both the parents and providers and the knowledge about vaccines all influence vaccination compliance.

Methods: My colleagues and I surveyed rural communities in Texas to assess parental knowledge and how that affected vaccination compliance. Clifton, Texas is located in Bosque County. As of the census of 2000, there were 3,542 people. Plainview, Texas is located in Hale County. The current census data reports a population of 22,194. Bilingual versions of surveys developed by Zingg et al were distributed to participants with children up to 10 years of age who live in or near the rural towns of Clifton or Plainview between the fall of 2015 and the spring of 2016.

Results: When analyzing survey results, correct knowledge was estimated by summing over the number of correct answers for the 11 items in the survey. Using a multiple linear regression model our study revealed that here is statistically significant difference in knowledge on vaccination for parents who has a Bachelor degree or more in comparison to parents who are high school graduate or less after adjusting for the effects of race and number of children. However, there is no statistically significant difference in knowledge on vaccination for parents who has some college degree in comparison to parents who are high school graduate or less after adjusting for the effects of race and number of children.

Conclusions: On an average, parent’s knowledge on vaccination increases as their number of children increases after adjusting for the effects of educational status and race. There is no statistical difference on vaccination knowledge in White versus Hispanic and White versus Other racial groups after adjusting for the effects of parent’s education and number of children.