Abstract Title

Perspectives on Cancer and Cancer Screenings Among Refugee Immigrants

Presenter Name

Iram Qureshi

RAD Assignment Number

2606

Abstract

Purpose: The United States Preventive Services Task Force advises women to receive timely cervical, breast, and colorectal cancer screenings, however, studies show refugee women are less likely to receive these screenings. The purpose of this study is to identify cancer knowledge and barriers to recommended cancer screenings from the perspective of refugee women.

Materials and Methods: Female Lay Health educators from four refugee communities provided cancer education to women enrolled in the Building Bridges Imitative. Qualitative statements from participants were collected at the education sessions and post intervention assessments and grouped into themes

Results: The data collected showed that cancer screening practices were low and many cultural misconceptions on screening practices exist in refugee communities. Refugee women had limited knowledge on the cause of cancer and its ability to be treated.

Conclusions: Understanding more about the barriers to cancer screenings from the perspective of refugee women can help create or refine interventions. Culturally tailored cancer education interventions can be beneficial in correcting cancer and cancer screening myths among refugee populations

Research Area

Women's Health

Presentation Type

Poster

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Perspectives on Cancer and Cancer Screenings Among Refugee Immigrants

Purpose: The United States Preventive Services Task Force advises women to receive timely cervical, breast, and colorectal cancer screenings, however, studies show refugee women are less likely to receive these screenings. The purpose of this study is to identify cancer knowledge and barriers to recommended cancer screenings from the perspective of refugee women.

Materials and Methods: Female Lay Health educators from four refugee communities provided cancer education to women enrolled in the Building Bridges Imitative. Qualitative statements from participants were collected at the education sessions and post intervention assessments and grouped into themes

Results: The data collected showed that cancer screening practices were low and many cultural misconceptions on screening practices exist in refugee communities. Refugee women had limited knowledge on the cause of cancer and its ability to be treated.

Conclusions: Understanding more about the barriers to cancer screenings from the perspective of refugee women can help create or refine interventions. Culturally tailored cancer education interventions can be beneficial in correcting cancer and cancer screening myths among refugee populations