Abstract Title

Does General Health Differ by Physical Activity Level in Middle Aged Diabetic Females?

Presenter Name

Madeline Bliha

RAD Assignment Number

700

Abstract

Purpose: Diabetes is a widespread health issue in the general population, but limited information is available for the relationship between physical activity level and general health in diabetic patients, especially in specific age or gender subpopulations. The goal of this study was to determine whether general health differs by physical activity level in middle-aged diabetic females.

Methods: This cross-sectional analysis used 2015 BRFSS data for middle-aged diabetic females ages 45-64 from Arkansas, Missouri, Ohio and West Virginia. Multiple logistic regression analysis assessed the relationship between physical activity level and general health while controlling for weight status, health conditions, alcohol use, tobacco use, education level, employment status, age, and ethnicity/race.

Results: Across states, about half of the females ages 45-64 reported having good or better general health (38-52%) and less reported being highly active (16-23%). The results of adjusted analysis indicated good or better general health was significantly related to highly active physical activity level in Ohio (AOR= 3.09, 95%CI= 1.55, 6.15) and Missouri (AOR= 5.72, 95%CI= 1.99-16.80). Additionally, good or better general health was related to employment status in all four states (large effect sizes). In contrast, good or better general health was inversely related to health conditions in two of the four states (large effect sizes).

Conclusions: A highly active physical activity level was found to be significantly related to general health in two out of four states. Since this data was from a population-based study, the results may generalize to middle-aged diabetic females presenting to a general practice clinic. Thus, primary care practitioners can expect to see a low to moderate prevalence of middle-aged diabetic females reporting a highly active physical activity level and good or better general health. Providers should consider assessing the activity level and general health of diabetic middle-aged female patients as well as consider their comorbid health conditions and provide education and resources to encourage physical activity as indicated.

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Research Area

Diabetes

Presentation Type

Poster

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Does General Health Differ by Physical Activity Level in Middle Aged Diabetic Females?

Purpose: Diabetes is a widespread health issue in the general population, but limited information is available for the relationship between physical activity level and general health in diabetic patients, especially in specific age or gender subpopulations. The goal of this study was to determine whether general health differs by physical activity level in middle-aged diabetic females.

Methods: This cross-sectional analysis used 2015 BRFSS data for middle-aged diabetic females ages 45-64 from Arkansas, Missouri, Ohio and West Virginia. Multiple logistic regression analysis assessed the relationship between physical activity level and general health while controlling for weight status, health conditions, alcohol use, tobacco use, education level, employment status, age, and ethnicity/race.

Results: Across states, about half of the females ages 45-64 reported having good or better general health (38-52%) and less reported being highly active (16-23%). The results of adjusted analysis indicated good or better general health was significantly related to highly active physical activity level in Ohio (AOR= 3.09, 95%CI= 1.55, 6.15) and Missouri (AOR= 5.72, 95%CI= 1.99-16.80). Additionally, good or better general health was related to employment status in all four states (large effect sizes). In contrast, good or better general health was inversely related to health conditions in two of the four states (large effect sizes).

Conclusions: A highly active physical activity level was found to be significantly related to general health in two out of four states. Since this data was from a population-based study, the results may generalize to middle-aged diabetic females presenting to a general practice clinic. Thus, primary care practitioners can expect to see a low to moderate prevalence of middle-aged diabetic females reporting a highly active physical activity level and good or better general health. Providers should consider assessing the activity level and general health of diabetic middle-aged female patients as well as consider their comorbid health conditions and provide education and resources to encourage physical activity as indicated.