Abstract Title

Does the Relationship Between Activity Limitations and Mental Health Differ by Gender in Diabetic Adults Age 45 Years and Older?

Presenter Name

Sonam Khanjae

RAD Assignment Number

702

Abstract

Purpose: In the United States, there is a moderate prevalence of disability and mental illness among adults, with diabetes as a contributing risk factor. Given the limited research among diabetics, the purpose of this study was to determine whether the relationship between activity limitations and mental health differs by gender in diabetic adults age 45 and older.

Method: This cross-sectional analysis used data from the 2015 BRFSS for pre-diabetic and diabetic adults age 45 years and older from Arkansas, Tennessee, Oklahoma, and Alabama. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between mental health and activity limitations while controlling for depression, health conditions, weight status, age, ethnicity/race, marital status, education level, employment status, income level, and gender.

Results: About two-thirds of pre-diabetic and diabetic adults age 45 years and older reported less than 30 days of good mental health (33-36%) and less than half reported two or more activity limitations (36-42%). After controlling for socioeconomic, demographic, and health related variables, males with two or more activity limitations were about 3-5 times less likely to report good mental health in all four states. Likewise, females with two or more activity limitations were about 2-4 times less likely to report good mental health in all states except Arkansas. Additionally, depression was found to be significantly and inversely related to mental health in four of four states in both males and females.

Conclusion: Overall, mental health and activity limitations were found to be inversely related in pre-diabetic and diabetic adults age 45 and older. A major limitation of this study was the inability to assess the severity of disease states, and whether they were controlled with medication. General practitioners can expect to see a moderate prevalence of poor mental health and activity limitations in pre-diabetic and diabetic adults age 45 years and older, particularly in patients with a history of depression. Primary care providers should provide mental health screens and referrals in pre-diabetic and diabetic adult patients presenting with two or more activity limitations, especially in males. Additionally, providers should screen for activity limitations if pre-diabetic and diabetic adult patients present with poor mental health.

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Research Area

Diabetes

Presentation Type

Poster

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Does the Relationship Between Activity Limitations and Mental Health Differ by Gender in Diabetic Adults Age 45 Years and Older?

Purpose: In the United States, there is a moderate prevalence of disability and mental illness among adults, with diabetes as a contributing risk factor. Given the limited research among diabetics, the purpose of this study was to determine whether the relationship between activity limitations and mental health differs by gender in diabetic adults age 45 and older.

Method: This cross-sectional analysis used data from the 2015 BRFSS for pre-diabetic and diabetic adults age 45 years and older from Arkansas, Tennessee, Oklahoma, and Alabama. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between mental health and activity limitations while controlling for depression, health conditions, weight status, age, ethnicity/race, marital status, education level, employment status, income level, and gender.

Results: About two-thirds of pre-diabetic and diabetic adults age 45 years and older reported less than 30 days of good mental health (33-36%) and less than half reported two or more activity limitations (36-42%). After controlling for socioeconomic, demographic, and health related variables, males with two or more activity limitations were about 3-5 times less likely to report good mental health in all four states. Likewise, females with two or more activity limitations were about 2-4 times less likely to report good mental health in all states except Arkansas. Additionally, depression was found to be significantly and inversely related to mental health in four of four states in both males and females.

Conclusion: Overall, mental health and activity limitations were found to be inversely related in pre-diabetic and diabetic adults age 45 and older. A major limitation of this study was the inability to assess the severity of disease states, and whether they were controlled with medication. General practitioners can expect to see a moderate prevalence of poor mental health and activity limitations in pre-diabetic and diabetic adults age 45 years and older, particularly in patients with a history of depression. Primary care providers should provide mental health screens and referrals in pre-diabetic and diabetic adult patients presenting with two or more activity limitations, especially in males. Additionally, providers should screen for activity limitations if pre-diabetic and diabetic adult patients present with poor mental health.