Abstract Title

Service Learning: Doctor of Physical Therapy Year 1 Student Reflections After Participating in a Runner’s Health and Fitness Expo.

Presenter Name

Trisha Hawker

RAD Assignment Number

802

Abstract

Purpose: This study further investigated the role a short-term service learning activity at a runner’s health and wellness expo had on Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students. We hypothesized that after participating in this SL experience, DPT students will report improved ability to interact with clients, enhanced understanding of previously learned curricular content, and the expectation of improved clinical rotation experiences.

Methods: First-year DPT students performed Functional Movement Screens (FMS) on community participants during 3-4 hour shifts at a runner’s health and wellness expo. Forty-seven first-year DPT students, 30 females and 17 males, mean age of 25 years (22-32). Outcomes were assessed using a post-survey completed by the students through Qualtrics.

Results: The majority of student responses indicated a positive impression of this SL. Means of responses to detailed questions were high (4.21-4.66) covering student perceptions of the role of SL in the DPT curriculum, the impact of SL on clinical education, and the usefulness of this particular SL experience for future classes. Forty-seven percent (22 of 47) reported being no more than somewhat familiar with SL prior to participating. Following this activity, 91% (43 of 47) agreed that this SL experience furthered their understanding of curricular content, 96% (45 of 47) valued the importance of physical therapist participation in SL activities, and 96% (45 of 47) agreed that this SL opportunity should be kept in the curriculum for future cohorts.

Conclusions: The findings from this study were consistent with the hypotheses that students would report improved ability to interact with clients, enhanced understanding of previously learned curricular content, and the expectation of improved clinical experiences. This sample was limited to one cohort of year 1 DPT students at UNTHSC in Fort Worth, TX. Data may not be generalizable beyond these conditions. This SL experience gave students the opportunity to interact with community members and apply classroom knowledge at a health and fitness expo. This type of interaction allows students to practice using patient-friendly instructions and explanations which will be beneficial during clinical rotations and novice clinical practice.

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Presentation Type

Poster

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Service Learning: Doctor of Physical Therapy Year 1 Student Reflections After Participating in a Runner’s Health and Fitness Expo.

Purpose: This study further investigated the role a short-term service learning activity at a runner’s health and wellness expo had on Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students. We hypothesized that after participating in this SL experience, DPT students will report improved ability to interact with clients, enhanced understanding of previously learned curricular content, and the expectation of improved clinical rotation experiences.

Methods: First-year DPT students performed Functional Movement Screens (FMS) on community participants during 3-4 hour shifts at a runner’s health and wellness expo. Forty-seven first-year DPT students, 30 females and 17 males, mean age of 25 years (22-32). Outcomes were assessed using a post-survey completed by the students through Qualtrics.

Results: The majority of student responses indicated a positive impression of this SL. Means of responses to detailed questions were high (4.21-4.66) covering student perceptions of the role of SL in the DPT curriculum, the impact of SL on clinical education, and the usefulness of this particular SL experience for future classes. Forty-seven percent (22 of 47) reported being no more than somewhat familiar with SL prior to participating. Following this activity, 91% (43 of 47) agreed that this SL experience furthered their understanding of curricular content, 96% (45 of 47) valued the importance of physical therapist participation in SL activities, and 96% (45 of 47) agreed that this SL opportunity should be kept in the curriculum for future cohorts.

Conclusions: The findings from this study were consistent with the hypotheses that students would report improved ability to interact with clients, enhanced understanding of previously learned curricular content, and the expectation of improved clinical experiences. This sample was limited to one cohort of year 1 DPT students at UNTHSC in Fort Worth, TX. Data may not be generalizable beyond these conditions. This SL experience gave students the opportunity to interact with community members and apply classroom knowledge at a health and fitness expo. This type of interaction allows students to practice using patient-friendly instructions and explanations which will be beneficial during clinical rotations and novice clinical practice.