Abstract Title

Does the Relationship Between Depression and Physical Activity Differ by Gender in Young Adults Ages 25-34?

Presenter Name

Charis Sarradet, PA-S

RAD Assignment Number

1122

Abstract

Purpose: Depression has become a significant health concern in the United States and has been linked to physical activity in previous research; however, there is insufficient research on the relationship between physical activity and depression between genders in young adults ages 25-34. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the relationship between physical activity and depression differs by gender in young adults ages 25-34.

Methods: This cross-sectional analysis used 2015 data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for males and females ages 25-34 from Maine, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between depression and physical activity, while controlling for age, ethnicity/race, income level, weight status, tobacco use, alcohol use, and activity limitations.

Results: Across states, about one-fourth of young adults reported ever having been diagnosed with depression or dysthymia (25-29%) or being highly active (22-36%). After controlling for demographic factors, socioeconomic status, and psychosocial factors, depression was not significantly related to physical activity in males or females in ME, OR, or VT. However, depression was significantly related to activity limitations in both males and females in all four states, and significantly related to tobacco use in females in ME, OR, and RI.

Conclusions: Overall, depression was not significantly related to physical activity in males or females ages 25-34. However, depression was significantly related to activity limitations in both males and females in all four states as well as tobacco use in females in three of the four states. This study was limited by an inability to obtain information on duration, extent, or prior treatment of depression in participants. Although the prevalence of depression may be low to moderate in primary care, it is recommended that providers screen all young adults for depression if they present with depressive symptoms and refer to a mental health clinic for treatment. Additionally, providers should screen all young adults with depression for activity limitations as well as young adult females with depression for tobacco use, and vice versa, and provide education, treatment, and referrals as needed.

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Research Area

General Public Health

Presentation Type

Poster

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Does the Relationship Between Depression and Physical Activity Differ by Gender in Young Adults Ages 25-34?

Purpose: Depression has become a significant health concern in the United States and has been linked to physical activity in previous research; however, there is insufficient research on the relationship between physical activity and depression between genders in young adults ages 25-34. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the relationship between physical activity and depression differs by gender in young adults ages 25-34.

Methods: This cross-sectional analysis used 2015 data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for males and females ages 25-34 from Maine, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between depression and physical activity, while controlling for age, ethnicity/race, income level, weight status, tobacco use, alcohol use, and activity limitations.

Results: Across states, about one-fourth of young adults reported ever having been diagnosed with depression or dysthymia (25-29%) or being highly active (22-36%). After controlling for demographic factors, socioeconomic status, and psychosocial factors, depression was not significantly related to physical activity in males or females in ME, OR, or VT. However, depression was significantly related to activity limitations in both males and females in all four states, and significantly related to tobacco use in females in ME, OR, and RI.

Conclusions: Overall, depression was not significantly related to physical activity in males or females ages 25-34. However, depression was significantly related to activity limitations in both males and females in all four states as well as tobacco use in females in three of the four states. This study was limited by an inability to obtain information on duration, extent, or prior treatment of depression in participants. Although the prevalence of depression may be low to moderate in primary care, it is recommended that providers screen all young adults for depression if they present with depressive symptoms and refer to a mental health clinic for treatment. Additionally, providers should screen all young adults with depression for activity limitations as well as young adult females with depression for tobacco use, and vice versa, and provide education, treatment, and referrals as needed.