Abstract Title

INTERACTIONS BETWEEN T-CELLS AND ASTROCYTES POST-ISCHEMIC STROKE

Presenter Name

Jessica Hersh

RAD Assignment Number

1705

Abstract

Purpose: In post-ischemic stroke, T-lymphocytes enter the brain. Presently, the role of these T-cells in the progression of cerebral infarction or repair mechanisms is unclear. Our goal is to analyze the function of T-cells in regions of cerebral infarction by examining the pro- and anti-inflammatory interaction between T-cells and brain cells within these lesions.

Methods: Ischemic stroke was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in young adult C57/B6 male mice. Mice were sacrificed at 3 days or 1-month post-ischemic stroke. T-cells were harvested from the brain by digestion; percoll enriched, and incubated with anti-CD3 and CD25 antibodies. T-cells were sorted via flow cytometry. The cytokine expression profile of brain infiltrated T-cells was compared to spleen T-cells using q-RTPCR.

Results: In this in vivo study the following cytokines, poststroke, were found to be elevated: IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-17, TNF, Perforin, T-bet, and RORc.

Conclusions: Our data suggests that understanding the interaction between T-cells and astrocytes could open new therapeutic strategies for stroke patients.

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Research Area

Neuroscience

Presentation Type

Poster

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INTERACTIONS BETWEEN T-CELLS AND ASTROCYTES POST-ISCHEMIC STROKE

Purpose: In post-ischemic stroke, T-lymphocytes enter the brain. Presently, the role of these T-cells in the progression of cerebral infarction or repair mechanisms is unclear. Our goal is to analyze the function of T-cells in regions of cerebral infarction by examining the pro- and anti-inflammatory interaction between T-cells and brain cells within these lesions.

Methods: Ischemic stroke was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in young adult C57/B6 male mice. Mice were sacrificed at 3 days or 1-month post-ischemic stroke. T-cells were harvested from the brain by digestion; percoll enriched, and incubated with anti-CD3 and CD25 antibodies. T-cells were sorted via flow cytometry. The cytokine expression profile of brain infiltrated T-cells was compared to spleen T-cells using q-RTPCR.

Results: In this in vivo study the following cytokines, poststroke, were found to be elevated: IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-17, TNF, Perforin, T-bet, and RORc.

Conclusions: Our data suggests that understanding the interaction between T-cells and astrocytes could open new therapeutic strategies for stroke patients.