Presentation Title (IN ALL CAPS)

Effect of nanoparticle surface charge on the cellular uptake of hydrophobic drug loaded nanoparticles for cancer therapy

Presenter/Author(s) Information

Maia BoldenFollow

Departmental Affiliation and City, State, Zip for All Authors

Research reported in this publication was supported by a Collaboration Undergraduate HBCU-STP Grant PC150726 from the Department of Defense Prostate Cancer Research Program (DOD-PCRP) to Jamboor K. Vishwanatha, Ph.D. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the Department of Defense.

Scientific Abstract

A Nanoparticle (NP) is a particle of any shape with dimensions in the 1-100nm range, as defined by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). The growing interest in applying nanotechnology to cancer is attributed to its potential for drug delivery, diagnosis and imaging, synthetic vaccine development, and small-scale medical devices. Additionally, many of the nanomaterials are intrinsically therapeutic. NPs can be made using a variety of materials which, include polymers, lipids, viruses, and even organometallic compounds. Moreover, both passive and active targeting strategies can enhance the intracellular concentration of drugs in cancer cells while avoiding toxicity in healthy cells. In this project, the drug Curcumin was injected into a nanoparticle to target diseased tissues with a minimal amount of damage to healthy tissues.

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Effect of nanoparticle surface charge on the cellular uptake of hydrophobic drug loaded nanoparticles for cancer therapy

A Nanoparticle (NP) is a particle of any shape with dimensions in the 1-100nm range, as defined by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). The growing interest in applying nanotechnology to cancer is attributed to its potential for drug delivery, diagnosis and imaging, synthetic vaccine development, and small-scale medical devices. Additionally, many of the nanomaterials are intrinsically therapeutic. NPs can be made using a variety of materials which, include polymers, lipids, viruses, and even organometallic compounds. Moreover, both passive and active targeting strategies can enhance the intracellular concentration of drugs in cancer cells while avoiding toxicity in healthy cells. In this project, the drug Curcumin was injected into a nanoparticle to target diseased tissues with a minimal amount of damage to healthy tissues.

Manuscript Number

1045