Presentation Title (IN ALL CAPS)

The Immune Function During Space Flight

Departmental Affiliation and City, State, Zip for All Authors

Institute for Molecular & Medical Genetics

Scientific Abstract

Microgravity experienced during spaceflight is known to adversely impact astronauts’ health that may lead to serious acute and chronic inflammatory disease. In ground-based space flight models, there is evidence of immune compromise and reactivation of latent viral infection. A dysregulation in immune function is believed to a key mediating factor. To further define the mechanisms mediating microgravity-induced immune dysfunction, it is important to develop ground-based analogs and methodology that depict microgravity conditions. The long-term goal of our studies is to identify mechanisms through which microgravity alters immune function that can be used to develop interventions to protect astronauts’ health. The purpose of the current study is to develop a ground-based in vitro system to determine the effects of microgravity on leukocytes function. Using primary murine splenocytes, we determined the effect of simulated microgravity on CD4 positive and CD8-positive T cells. We hypothesized that exposure to ground-based microgravity would globally decrease the percentage of total CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and effect splenoctye cytokine production. Results demonstrated that splenoctyes exposed to microgravity when stimulated in vitro with anti-CD3, resulted in a decrease in the percentage of CD4/CD8, but a slight increase in CD8 control T cells. Currently we are conduction pilot studies to measure IL-17A, IL-10, IL-4, IFN-Gamma and IL-6 when simulated in vitro. Results show that Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation increased IL-17A production by splenoctyes. Studies in progress are determining the effect of microgravity on cytokine production when stimulated with anti-CD3.

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The Immune Function During Space Flight

Microgravity experienced during spaceflight is known to adversely impact astronauts’ health that may lead to serious acute and chronic inflammatory disease. In ground-based space flight models, there is evidence of immune compromise and reactivation of latent viral infection. A dysregulation in immune function is believed to a key mediating factor. To further define the mechanisms mediating microgravity-induced immune dysfunction, it is important to develop ground-based analogs and methodology that depict microgravity conditions. The long-term goal of our studies is to identify mechanisms through which microgravity alters immune function that can be used to develop interventions to protect astronauts’ health. The purpose of the current study is to develop a ground-based in vitro system to determine the effects of microgravity on leukocytes function. Using primary murine splenocytes, we determined the effect of simulated microgravity on CD4 positive and CD8-positive T cells. We hypothesized that exposure to ground-based microgravity would globally decrease the percentage of total CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and effect splenoctye cytokine production. Results demonstrated that splenoctyes exposed to microgravity when stimulated in vitro with anti-CD3, resulted in a decrease in the percentage of CD4/CD8, but a slight increase in CD8 control T cells. Currently we are conduction pilot studies to measure IL-17A, IL-10, IL-4, IFN-Gamma and IL-6 when simulated in vitro. Results show that Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation increased IL-17A production by splenoctyes. Studies in progress are determining the effect of microgravity on cytokine production when stimulated with anti-CD3.

Manuscript Number

1054