Presentation Title (IN ALL CAPS)

Sleep Apnea: More than Snoring.

Departmental Affiliation and City, State, Zip for All Authors

First Author: Midwestern State University. 3410 Taft Blvd, Wichita Falls, TX, 76308. Second and Third Author: UNT Health Science Center. 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, TX 76107

Scientific Abstract

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative condition associated with motor dysfunction. PD is the 14th cause of death in the United States, affecting approximately 1 million people. A common comorbidity of PD is sleep apnea, which can increase oxidative stress, a key characteristic of PD. Because of these associations, we hypothesize that exposure of male rats to Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia (CIH), a sleep apnea animal model, will lead to motor and social deficits. Young adult male Long-Evans rats were exposed to CIH for 7 days at AHI=8 (8 cycles/hour of 21% to 10% oxygen). Eight rats underwent sham-gonadectomy and were given subcutaneous cholesterol capsules. A subset of rats received sham-stereotaxic surgery. Rats were then exposed to 9 consecutive days of CIH for 8 hours while the rats slept. On days 8-9 of CIH, behavioral testing was conducted. Tests included Challenge Ladder, Cylinder test, and Rotation test to examine motor function. In addition, we examined ultrasonic vocalizations and olfaction. Results showed no differences between rats with and without sham-stereotaxic surgery, based on oxidative stress and behavior tests that examine unilateral weakness. Therefore, these groups were combined. CIH did not influence motor function. In addition, we examined olfaction and communication. All rats had intact olfactory and vocalization capabilities. No overt differences were observed. However, with a higher number of animals we may be able to distinguish finer olfactory and vocalization capabilities. The results are consistent with clinical PD presentations, since olfaction and communication are not observed in all cases.

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Sleep Apnea: More than Snoring.

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative condition associated with motor dysfunction. PD is the 14th cause of death in the United States, affecting approximately 1 million people. A common comorbidity of PD is sleep apnea, which can increase oxidative stress, a key characteristic of PD. Because of these associations, we hypothesize that exposure of male rats to Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia (CIH), a sleep apnea animal model, will lead to motor and social deficits. Young adult male Long-Evans rats were exposed to CIH for 7 days at AHI=8 (8 cycles/hour of 21% to 10% oxygen). Eight rats underwent sham-gonadectomy and were given subcutaneous cholesterol capsules. A subset of rats received sham-stereotaxic surgery. Rats were then exposed to 9 consecutive days of CIH for 8 hours while the rats slept. On days 8-9 of CIH, behavioral testing was conducted. Tests included Challenge Ladder, Cylinder test, and Rotation test to examine motor function. In addition, we examined ultrasonic vocalizations and olfaction. Results showed no differences between rats with and without sham-stereotaxic surgery, based on oxidative stress and behavior tests that examine unilateral weakness. Therefore, these groups were combined. CIH did not influence motor function. In addition, we examined olfaction and communication. All rats had intact olfactory and vocalization capabilities. No overt differences were observed. However, with a higher number of animals we may be able to distinguish finer olfactory and vocalization capabilities. The results are consistent with clinical PD presentations, since olfaction and communication are not observed in all cases.

Manuscript Number

1050