Departmental Affiliation and City, State, Zip for All Authors

College of Natural & Social Sciences, Texas Wesleyan University, Fort Worth, Texas 76105; Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, Texas 76107; Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, Texas 76107; Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, Texas 76107

Scientific Abstract

OPTIMIZATION OF LIPOSOME FORMULATIONS USING THIN FILM HYDRATION FOLLOWED BY EXTRUSION Toi Nguyen*, Ina Mishra**, Stephen Curry**, Michail Kastellorizios** *College of Natural & Social Sciences, Texas Wesleyan University, Fort Worth, Texas 76105, **Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, Texas 76107 Liposomes are phospholipid bilayer vesicles, the formulation of which has been thoroughly studied in order to maximize their drug delivering efficiency. The objectives of this project were to: i) optimize liposome formulations using the thin film hydration method; ii) prepare collagen-coated surfaces using rat tail collagen as well as human collagen; and iii) develop a capillary rise method for measuring surface activity of liposomes. The liposome composition was 1:1 or 2:1 molar ratio of phosphatidylcholine (PC) to cholesterol (Chol) with 5% w/w of methylene blue to the total mass of PC and Chol. The optimized formulation consisted of five steps, including lipid thin-layered film preparation in a rotary evaporator, hydration of the lipid film with phosphate buffer saline (PBS), size reduction to nano-scale using extrusion, purification using the liposomal extruder purification (LEP) method, and size characterization using dynamic light scattering (DLS). Collagen coating was initially performed with rat tail collagen for the purpose of optimization although human collagen will also be used. The preliminary results showed that the 2:1 molar ratio of PC:Chol was optimal in obtaining a lipid thin film. DLS also showed 97.3 ± 0.75 mass %, 98.930 ± 0.77 intensity % as well as normal distribution of liposomes with average diameter of 170.0 ± 1.72 nm after extrusion using 200-nm pore membrane and LEP using 100-nm pore membrane. Future work will focus on optimizing the production of an evenly distributed collagen coatings over glass surfaces and completion of the capillary rise experiment for measurement of liposome surface activity. Keywords: liposomes, thin film hydration, extrusion

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OPTIMIZATION OF LIPOSOME FORMULATIONS USING THIN FILM HYDRATION FOLLOWED BY EXTRUSION

OPTIMIZATION OF LIPOSOME FORMULATIONS USING THIN FILM HYDRATION FOLLOWED BY EXTRUSION Toi Nguyen*, Ina Mishra**, Stephen Curry**, Michail Kastellorizios** *College of Natural & Social Sciences, Texas Wesleyan University, Fort Worth, Texas 76105, **Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, Texas 76107 Liposomes are phospholipid bilayer vesicles, the formulation of which has been thoroughly studied in order to maximize their drug delivering efficiency. The objectives of this project were to: i) optimize liposome formulations using the thin film hydration method; ii) prepare collagen-coated surfaces using rat tail collagen as well as human collagen; and iii) develop a capillary rise method for measuring surface activity of liposomes. The liposome composition was 1:1 or 2:1 molar ratio of phosphatidylcholine (PC) to cholesterol (Chol) with 5% w/w of methylene blue to the total mass of PC and Chol. The optimized formulation consisted of five steps, including lipid thin-layered film preparation in a rotary evaporator, hydration of the lipid film with phosphate buffer saline (PBS), size reduction to nano-scale using extrusion, purification using the liposomal extruder purification (LEP) method, and size characterization using dynamic light scattering (DLS). Collagen coating was initially performed with rat tail collagen for the purpose of optimization although human collagen will also be used. The preliminary results showed that the 2:1 molar ratio of PC:Chol was optimal in obtaining a lipid thin film. DLS also showed 97.3 ± 0.75 mass %, 98.930 ± 0.77 intensity % as well as normal distribution of liposomes with average diameter of 170.0 ± 1.72 nm after extrusion using 200-nm pore membrane and LEP using 100-nm pore membrane. Future work will focus on optimizing the production of an evenly distributed collagen coatings over glass surfaces and completion of the capillary rise experiment for measurement of liposome surface activity. Keywords: liposomes, thin film hydration, extrusion

Manuscript Number

1047