Presentation Title (IN ALL CAPS)

ARE WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE, SAGITTAL ABDOMINAL DIAMETER, AND WAIST-TO-HEIGHT RATIO BETTER PREDICTORS OF CARDIOVASCULAR RISK THAN BMI?

Departmental Affiliation and City, State, Zip for All Authors

SPH, Fort Worth, Texas, 76107; SPH, Fort Worth, Texas, 76107

Classification

SPH Student (For Competition)

Research Presentation Category

Basic Science Research

Layperson Narrative or Summary (3-5 sentences)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate waist circumference, sagittal abdominal diameter, and waist-to-hip ratio as surrogate measures of abdominal obesity, and compare their performance with BMI to predict cardiovascular risk. A total of 6,118 adult subjects were selected from NHANES 2013-2014 for this study. Sagittal abdominal diameter is a better predictor of cardiovascular risks than BMI. Future studies may address the cost-effectiveness in replacing BMI by sagittal abdominal diameter.

Scientific Abstract

Purpose: Body mass index (BMI) is one of the popular surrogate measures of excess body fat, and it is established as a predictor of cardiovascular risk. While abdominal obesity is associated with cardiovascular disease, BMI does not account abdominal fat; rather it accounts for the overall excess fat. The purpose of this study was to evaluate waist circumference, sagittal abdominal diameter, and waist-to-hip ratio as surrogate measures of abdominal obesity, and compare their performance with BMI to predict cardiovascular risk. Methods: A total of 6,118 adult subjects were selected from NHANES 2013-2014 for this study. High-density lipoprotein (HDL), hypertension, and diabetes were used as risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Weighted logistic regression models were used for each risk factor to estimate the effect of body fat measures, after adjusting for other covariates. Areas under receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were used to compare the performance of the different body fat measures in estimating cardiovascular risks. Results: About 22% participants had low HDL (<=40mg/dL), 35% participants were hypertensive, and 15% participants were diabetic. After adjusting for other covariates, BMI, sagittal abdominal diameter, waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio were found significant predictors (p-value<0.001 in each model) for low HDL, hypertension, and diabetes. Based on area under ROC curves, sagittal abdominal diameter showed slightly superior performance in predicting cardiovascular risks than BMI and the other two measures. Conclusion: Sagittal abdominal diameter is a better predictor of cardiovascular risks than BMI. Future studies may address the cost-effectiveness in replacing BMI by sagittal abdominal diameter.

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ARE WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE, SAGITTAL ABDOMINAL DIAMETER, AND WAIST-TO-HEIGHT RATIO BETTER PREDICTORS OF CARDIOVASCULAR RISK THAN BMI?

Purpose: Body mass index (BMI) is one of the popular surrogate measures of excess body fat, and it is established as a predictor of cardiovascular risk. While abdominal obesity is associated with cardiovascular disease, BMI does not account abdominal fat; rather it accounts for the overall excess fat. The purpose of this study was to evaluate waist circumference, sagittal abdominal diameter, and waist-to-hip ratio as surrogate measures of abdominal obesity, and compare their performance with BMI to predict cardiovascular risk. Methods: A total of 6,118 adult subjects were selected from NHANES 2013-2014 for this study. High-density lipoprotein (HDL), hypertension, and diabetes were used as risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Weighted logistic regression models were used for each risk factor to estimate the effect of body fat measures, after adjusting for other covariates. Areas under receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were used to compare the performance of the different body fat measures in estimating cardiovascular risks. Results: About 22% participants had low HDL (<=40mg/dL), 35% participants were hypertensive, and 15% participants were diabetic. After adjusting for other covariates, BMI, sagittal abdominal diameter, waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio were found significant predictors (p-value<0.001 in each model) for low HDL, hypertension, and diabetes. Based on area under ROC curves, sagittal abdominal diameter showed slightly superior performance in predicting cardiovascular risks than BMI and the other two measures. Conclusion: Sagittal abdominal diameter is a better predictor of cardiovascular risks than BMI. Future studies may address the cost-effectiveness in replacing BMI by sagittal abdominal diameter.